@ZackArgyle 1. Start with plain React. 2. Lift state as needed. 3. Still feeling pain? Use Redux/Context/etc.

  • Currently, both components independently keep their values in the local state: – – However, we want these two inputs to be in sync with each other.
  • Since the props of both components are coming from the same parent component, the two inputs will always be in sync.
  • It will handle the change by modifying its own local state, thus re-rendering both inputs with the new values.
  • For example, if we enter 37 into the Celsius input, the state of the component will be: – – If we later edit the Fahrenheit field to be 212, the state of the will be: – – We could have stored the value of both inputs but it turns out…
  • The inputs stay in sync because their values are computed from the same state: – – Try it on CodePen.

Often, several components need to reflect the same changing data. We recommend lifting the shared state up to their closest common ancestor. Let’s see how this works in action.
Continue reading “@ZackArgyle 1. Start with plain React.
2. Lift state as needed.
3. Still feeling pain? Use Redux/Context/etc.”

Understanding State and Props in React – Hacker Noon

Understanding State and Props in React @RuairidhWM  #JavaScript #Reactjs #WebDev

  • Understanding State and Props in ReactI’ve been playing around with React and Redux recently and thought I would start writing articles on concepts which I’ve had to wrap my head around.So unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past few years, you’ll know that React is an awesome front-end library developed by the good folks at Facebook to make life easier for developers.It’s different to Angular or other frameworks as it is purely front-end (though see the comments below for a great clarification on this).
  • With that said, it’s extremely powerful.One of the concepts I struggled to understand during my learning more about React was the interaction between State and Props.
  • If you’re at all familiar with React then you should know that props flow downwards from the parent component.There is also the case that you can have default props so that props are set even if a parent component doesn’t pass props down.This is why people refer to React as having uni-directional data flow.
  • What happens when a component receives data from someone other than the parent?
  • This is super cool because that means React takes care of the hard work and is blazingly fast.As a little example of state, here is a snippet from a search bar (worth checking out this course if you want to learn more about React)Class SearchBar extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props);this.state = { term: ” }; }render() { return ( div className=”search-bar” input value={this.state.term} onChange={event = / /div ); }onInputChange(term) { this.setState({term}); }}SUMMARYProps and State do similar things but are used in different ways.

I’ve been playing around with React and Redux recently and thought I would start writing articles on concepts which I’ve had to wrap my head around. So unless you’ve been living in a cave for the…
Continue reading “Understanding State and Props in React – Hacker Noon”

Understanding State and Props in React – Ruairidh Wynne-McHardy – Medium

Understanding State and Props in React  #javascript #development #react #es6 #reactjs

  • Understanding State and Props in ReactI’ve been playing around with React and Redux recently and thought I would start writing articles on concepts which I’ve had to wrap my head around.So unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past few years, you’ll know that React is an awesome front-end library developed by the good folks at Facebook to make life easier for developers.It’s different to Angular or other frameworks as it is purely front-end.
  • With that said, it’s extremely powerful.One of the concepts I struggled to understand during my learning more about React was the interaction between State and Props.
  • If you’re at all familiar with React then you should know that props flow downwards from the parent component.There is also the case that you can have default props so that props are set even if a parent component doesn’t pass props down.This is why people refer to React as having uni-directional data flow.
  • What happens when a component receives data from someone other than the parent?
  • This is super cool because that means React takes care of the hard work and is blazingly fast.As a little example of state, here is a snippet from a search bar (worth checking out this course if you want to learn more about React)Class SearchBar extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props);this.state = { term: ” }; }render() { return ( div className=”search-bar” input value={this.state.term} onChange={event = / /div ); }onInputChange(term) { this.setState({term}); }}SUMMARYProps and State do similar things but are used in different ways.

I’ve been playing around with React and Redux recently and thought I would start writing articles on concepts which I’ve had to wrap my head around. So unless you’ve been living in a cave for the…
Continue reading “Understanding State and Props in React – Ruairidh Wynne-McHardy – Medium”

Form Controlled Components-React – Steven Meads – Medium

Form Controlled Components-React  #react #javascript #reactjs

  • Form Controlled Components-ReactI recently built a React application where a few components were input forms.
  • I’ve highlighted a few concepts I found most helpful below.Main ConceptsForm elements typically maintain their own state and update it based on user input.In React, mutable state is typically kept in the state property of components, and only updated with setState().
  • A React component that renders a form also controls what happens in that form on subsequent user input.An input form element whose value is controlled by React in this way is called a “controlled component”.
  • It is invoked via the onSubmit listener sitting on the form itself.We can then invoke a handleClick method, passed down from the parent component, pass it this.state.value as an argument, and now the input value from our user can be passed down as a prop to other components that depend on it.Quick SummaryIn short summary, setting up form elements as controlled components modifying or validating user input becomes much easier.
  • It also makes it more straightforward to pass user input up to the parent component where those input values can then be distributed throughout the application as needed.I hope this quick run through of form elements as controlled components was helpful.

I recently built a React application where a few components were input forms. Initially, I was at a loss about how I was going to retrieve the necessary input values needed for updating the parent…
Continue reading “Form Controlled Components-React – Steven Meads – Medium”

Introducing React Native Forms — Medium

Introducing #ReactJS Native forms:

  • But not only can you use React Native Forms to easily produce native-looking forms with default styling, it can be completely customized.
  • I’m open sourcing the library I wrote to quickly build forms at AuditionMe , React Native Forms.
  • Each form component should basically work the same way.
  • React Native Forms is already cross-platform, but I’d love to see the default Android styles look more like Android.
  • I shouldn’t have to look up a special set of props for every single component the form library provides.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Introducing #ReactJS Native forms:”


I’m open sourcing the library I wrote to quickly build forms at AuditionMe, React Native Forms. Check it out on Github: https://github.com…


Introducing React Native Forms — Medium