How to Build a Website with React, React Router & Styled-Components Pt.2

  • In this second, we will start by creating responsive navigation, playing with React , and creating a few more React components.
  • What is a better way to start the second part of this React website tutorial than resetting some default browser styles, such as those for , applied to element and applied to and, well, everything.
  • As the next step, we can take care about the first page for our React website, the homepage.
  • To keep our React website project tidy, we can put all components for typography into one file.
  • When we finished our work on these components, we put together the first page for our website, the homepage.

Have you ever though about building a website with React, React-router and styled-components? This tutorial is right for you. Practice creating React components, working with React state, using some handy helpers from styled-components. And, at the end, create your first page for your React website!
Continue reading “How to Build a Website with React, React Router & Styled-Components Pt.2”

How to Use New React Context Api detailed � – codeburst

  • How to Use New React Context Api Context Api is available in the react16.3 so let’s build a counter using Context api.
  • Context Api helps us to pass down the data to the components without use of props at every component.In our counter app we only pass down one level.So Let’s install a react app using create-react-app – npm install -g newContext – cd newContext – npm start //to start dev serverNow…
  • app.js(using props)Now we are replacing it with context API Instead of using props in the Counter component.
  • First, we need to import NumberContext from our context.js file – app.js(uses context api)In line 39 above code tells first we are providing value to our component by wrapping our Counter component with the NumberContext.Provider.
  • The completed app looks like below image – That’s all in react documentation says Context is designed to share data that can be considered “globalâ€� for a tree of React components.

Now we are replacing it with context API Instead of using props in the Counter component.
First, we need to import NumberContext from our context.js file In line 39 above code tells first we are…
Continue reading “How to Use New React Context Api detailed � – codeburst”

Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16

Sneak Peek: Beyond #React 16 - React Blog

  • The talk opens with a question: “With vast differences in computing power and network speed, how do we deliver the best user experience for everyone?”
  • On the first demo, Dan says: “We’ve built a generic way to ensure that high-priority updates don’t get blocked by a low-priority update, called time slicing.
  • On the second demo, Dan explains: “We’ve built a generic way for components to suspend rendering while they load async data, which we call suspense.
  • You can pause any state update until the data is ready, and you can add async loading to any component deep in the tree without plumbing all the props and state through your app and hoisting the logic.
  • On a slow network, you can intentionally design which loading states the user should see and how granular or coarse they should be, instead of showing spinners based on how the code is written.

Continue reading “Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16”

INTRODUCTION TO REACTJS – weLearn WeCode – Medium

Introduction to ReactJS


#javascript #reactjs #webdev #womenintech

  • ReactJS focuses only on the rendering of View (part of MVC), as it does not implement the entire MVC pattern, but tightly focuses on the development of components (views) which are displayed on the user-interface so that it is more efficient in developing dynamic and interactive user-interfaces and its components….
  • Traditionally, when we used to change the data (model in MVC) at server-side, we used to reload the entire page (at client-side) to implement or reflect the updates from the server, which make processing very slow and creates bad user-experiences.
  • But ReactJS has solved these issues as it works at the client-side and takes care of the updates from the server by just changing those particular components or parts of interfaces which are changed, and it does not reload the entire page.
  • DOM (Document Object Model) is the user-interface or HTML document which is rendered or displayed on the screen, and if we have to rerender the entire DOM every time to reflect the changes that come from the server, it would be very expensive and take many CPU-cycles and processor time….
  • To overcome these issues, ReactJS creates Virtual DOMs in memory and whenever any data is changed at the server, ReactJS rewrites the Virtual DOM, and then it performs “diff” operations between all Virtual DOMs… one which was created initially and the other which is created after the change of data….

ReactJS is a JavaScript library used to develop dynamic user-interfaces or the components of user-interfaces like search bars, sliders, and widgets in web applications. ReactJS focuses only on the…
Continue reading “INTRODUCTION TO REACTJS – weLearn WeCode – Medium”

Excited to host #ReactJS testing workshop by @NikkitaFTW at #ReactJSgirls on 10 April 🎉🎉🎉

Excited to host #ReactJS testing workshop by @NikkitaFTW at #ReactJSgirls on 10 April 🎉🎉🎉

  • • What we’ll do – – We’re excited to host Sara’s first workshop at ReactJS Girls!
  • Testing React Workshop – – – – In this workshop I will be going through unit testing in Javascript, how you can make it fun and meaningful for your app.
  • ** – – – – Sara Vieira (@NikkitaFTW) – – – – Front-End Developer at @YLDio, open sorcerer, maker of useless modules, Blogger, Drummer and horror movie fan girl – – – – — – – – – Thank you our sponsors for making this happen: – – – -…
  • The team is committed the open source community aiming to create a long-standing engineering culture and delivery capability in each piece of work.
  • YLD is looking for React / Node / Devops engineers to join the team: out Tech Talks YLD Youtube channel for more React / Node / Product talks; join the conversation on Twitter @YLDio (https://twitter.com/YLDio) and on LinkedIn us on Twitter @ReactJSgirls for more What to bring – – Bring…

• What we’ll doWe’re excited to host Sara’s first workshop at ReactJS Girls! Testing React WorkshopIn this workshop I will be going through unit testing in Javascript, how you can make it fun and mean
Continue reading “Excited to host #ReactJS testing workshop by @NikkitaFTW at #ReactJSgirls on 10 April 🎉🎉🎉”

Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16

  • The talk opens with a question: “With vast differences in computing power and network speed, how do we deliver the best user experience for everyone?”
  • On the first demo, Dan says: “We’ve built a generic way to ensure that high-priority updates don’t get blocked by a low-priority update, called time slicing.
  • On the second demo, Dan explains: “We’ve built a generic way for components to suspend rendering while they load async data, which we call suspense.
  • You can pause any state update until the data is ready, and you can add async loading to any component deep in the tree without plumbing all the props and state through your app and hoisting the logic.
  • On a slow network, you can intentionally design which loading states the user should see and how granular or coarse they should be, instead of showing spinners based on how the code is written.

Continue reading “Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16”

Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16

  • The talk opens with a question: “With vast differences in computing power and network speed, how do we deliver the best user experience for everyone?”
  • If my device is fast enough, it feels almost like it’s synchronous; if my device is slow, the app still feels responsive.
  • Notice that only the final state was displayed; the rendered screen is always consistent and we don’t see visual artifacts of slow rendering causing a janky user experience.”
  • On the second demo, Dan explains: “We’ve built a generic way for components to suspend rendering while they load async data.
  • On a slow network, you can intentionally design which loading states the user should see and how granular or coarse they should be, instead of showing spinners based on how the code is written.

Continue reading “Sneak Peek: Beyond React 16”

React’s new Context API

React's new Context API  #React  #reactjs

  • The provider component puts the data into context, and the Higher Order Component pulls the data out of context.
  • So in reality, redux isn’t allowing your data to be accessible anywhere… context is!
  • The first pull request to that repository is from Andrew Clark (react core team member) and it’s called “New version of context”.
  • The React team will remove the warning about context being an experimental feature because it’s now a “first-class feature” of the framework.
  • One question that I’ve seen a lot about the new context API (or the render prop pattern in general) is how to compose providers and consumers together.

Continue reading “React’s new Context API”

The Future of State in React

The Future of #State in #reactjs   #javascript #developers

  • React’s new Context API will be the go-to solution for sharing state simply™️.
  • In this post, I’ll describe Context by creating a simple theme-switching component: – – Since Context won’t be live until React 16.3, I’ll be using the polyfill.
  • Creating a Context instance is as simple as calling a function with a default value .
  • Context’s has less emphasis on global state than Redux and can be used to as little or as large a scale that you’d want: just like MobX.
  • In the following snippet, I set up a React Component that manages the state that our Provider will pass to those willing to consume it: – – Consumers must be descendants of its context’s Provider for it to access the value it wants.

The days of relying on state-management libraries for non-local state are coming to a close. You wont need Redux anymore. Not even MobX. React’s new Context API will be the go-to solution for sharing state simply™️.
Continue reading “The Future of State in React”

The Beginner’s Guide to ReactJS – kentcdodds

  • You can find it here: http://kcd.im/news-a11yTwo weeks ago, my newsletter was an overview of the Advanced React Component Patterns course (that’s been published today!)
  • This week I’d like to talk a little bit about the other course that was published: The Beginner’s Guide to ReactJS.In the beginner’s course every lesson is an individual index.html file.
  • If you ever teach a total beginner React, make sure that you help them get a solid understanding that creating React elements is not magic and that JSX is a really simple abstraction on top of React.createElement.
  • Learn React Fundamentals and Advanced Patterns — I’m just pretty excited about the course release!Egghead.io Sale — Save 30% on a year subscription!ReactPrimer – React component prototyping tool that generates fully connected class component code.Partial Application Lambda Parameter Syntax for JavaScript — Awesome use of babel-macrosUsing Glitch as a UNIX command line playground — Interesting idea!Some tweets from…
  • 🧟🧟‍♂️🏹 29 Nov 2017I’m having a conversation about semicolons again️ 30 Nov 2017Next language I learn will be @reasonml 👌 3 Dec my big announcement!My @eggheadio courses have been published and are totally FREE!“Learn React Fundamentals and Advanced Patterns” 4 Dec 2017P.

The course is free forever on Egghead.io! Let’s talk about how it teaches even developers experienced with React ⚛️ NOTE: This is a cross-post from my newsletter. I publish each email two weeks after…
Continue reading “The Beginner’s Guide to ReactJS – kentcdodds”