The Beginner’s Guide to ReactJS – kentcdodds

  • You can find it here: http://kcd.im/news-a11yTwo weeks ago, my newsletter was an overview of the Advanced React Component Patterns course (that’s been published today!)
  • This week I’d like to talk a little bit about the other course that was published: The Beginner’s Guide to ReactJS.In the beginner’s course every lesson is an individual index.html file.
  • If you ever teach a total beginner React, make sure that you help them get a solid understanding that creating React elements is not magic and that JSX is a really simple abstraction on top of React.createElement.
  • Learn React Fundamentals and Advanced Patterns — I’m just pretty excited about the course release!Egghead.io Sale — Save 30% on a year subscription!ReactPrimer – React component prototyping tool that generates fully connected class component code.Partial Application Lambda Parameter Syntax for JavaScript — Awesome use of babel-macrosUsing Glitch as a UNIX command line playground — Interesting idea!Some tweets from…
  • 🧟🧟‍♂️🏹 29 Nov 2017I’m having a conversation about semicolons again️ 30 Nov 2017Next language I learn will be @reasonml 👌 3 Dec my big announcement!My @eggheadio courses have been published and are totally FREE!“Learn React Fundamentals and Advanced Patterns” 4 Dec 2017P.

The course is free forever on Egghead.io! Let’s talk about how it teaches even developers experienced with React ⚛️ NOTE: This is a cross-post from my newsletter. I publish each email two weeks after…
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Speaker: Nader Dabit: O’Reilly Fluent Conference, June 19

  • •  (800) 889-8969 or (707) 827-7019  •  Monday-Friday 7:30am-5pm PT  •  All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on oreilly.com are the property of their respective owners.
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Nader Dabit is the founder of React Native Training and has been creating applications using React Native for over 2 years.
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Improve Your UX by Dynamically Rendering Images via React

Improve Your UX by Dynamically Rendering Images via React @arwong09  #Reactjs #UX #Startups

  • It’s also how performant it is, how intuitive it is — how much it delights your user.We’ve all been there, discovering a new app or web page for the first time and seeing something like this:With high resolution photos and retina screens, it’s all too often we have to sit and watch images painstakingly render.
  • We accomplish this by using React’s onLoad event; we can make the request to the server for the image files, but not render the image in the DOM until the entire file has been downloaded.the end result: smooth as butterThe end result is an app that loads high resolution images and never keeps the user waiting.
  • The placeholder teases the user and lets them know images are being loaded.
  • Furthermore, we hold off on rendering the images until they have been fully downloaded from the server so our user never has to see images painting from top to bottom in the browser.view live demoShow Me the Code!Rendering the PlaceholderFor our placeholder component (LoadingItem in this example), we simply render the image and apply any animation effects we want:export default function () { return ( ReactCSSTransitionGroup transitionName=”loadingItem” transitionAppear={true} transitionAppearTimeout={500} transitionEnterTimeout={500} transitionLeaveTimeout={300} img className=”feed__loading-item” src={img} / /ReactCSSTransitionGroup )}In the render of our Feed component, we simply render LoadingItem as long as we still have FeedItems being loaded:export default class Feed extends Component { … render() { return ( div className=”feed” … {this.props.items.length this.state.loadedItems.length LoadingItem / } … /div ) }}Dynamically Rendering Images via `onLoad`Our Feed component works as follows:export default class Feed extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props) this.state = { loadedItems: [] } } onLoad(feedItem) { let updatedItems = this.state.loadedItems updatedItems.push({ name: feedItem.name, imgPath: feedItem.imgPath }) this.setState({ loadedItems: updatedItems }) }render() { return ( div className=”feed” h1 i) = FeedItem imgPath={item.imgPath} name={item.name} key={i} / )} {this.props.items.length this.state.loadedItems.length LoadingItem / } div className=”hidden” {this.props.items.map((item, i) = img src={item.imgPath} onLoad={this.onLoad.bind(this, item)} key={i} / )} /div /div ) }}So what’s happening here?
  • When the state updates, the newly loaded item is rendered into the DOM with the image already fully downloaded.That’s it!View live demoView full source code (star the repo if you found this helpful!)

It’s a competitive world out there right now. As we all know, just having a good idea isn’t enough to make your company the next billion dollar IPO. Execution is just as important, and when it comes…
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Testing React apps with Nightwatch

Testing #ReactJS apps E2E is simple with Nightwatch  - #developers #javascript

  • have the browser to open before all tests from this file, and then closed after the tests are finished they are finished
  • Now the before() hook will take care of login steps and the after() hook will close the browser when all tests from this file are done.
  • Since we have the command ready, we will want to use it in a test.
  • Once your test suite gets bigger, you’ll notice steps within your tests that could be abstracted away and reused across your project.
  • writing the test in Page Object Pattern methodology

Read the full article, click here.


@Syncano: “Testing #ReactJS apps E2E is simple with Nightwatch – #developers #javascript”


In this part of Testing React Apps with Nightwatch, I’ll talk about expanding your test framework with before() and after() hooks as well as custom commands


Testing React apps with Nightwatch

3 Splendid JavaScript Debugging Tips

3 Splendid JavaScript Debugging Tips SycPrTDU #ReactJS
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  • Share around anything related to programming including Java, JavaScript, PHP, C/C++, .Net, Node.js, Python, Ruby, iOS, Android, Database, Shell Scripting, UI/UX and more…
  • 3 really useful techniques for debugging JavaScript in Chrome.
  • Loading the player…

Read the full article, click here.


@react_planet: “3 Splendid JavaScript Debugging Tips SycPrTDU #ReactJS
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3 Splendid JavaScript Debugging Tips