Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint

  • pre: – use Aerys\Router; – use App\Action\HomeAction; – – return (Router $router) = { – $router-route( – “GET”, “/”, new HomeAction – ); – }; – – And, from routes/api.
  • pre: – use Aerys\Router; – use (Router $router) = { – $router-route( – “GET”, “/api”, new HomeAction – ); – }; – – Though simple routes, these helped me to test the code in config.pre.
  • From App\Action; – – use Aerys\Request; – use Aerys\Response; – – class HomeAction – { – public function __invoke(Request $request, – Response $response) – { – $response-end(“hello world”); – } – } – – One final touch was to add shortcut scripts, to launch dev and prod versions of the…
  • From composer.json: – “scripts”: { – “dev”: “vendor/bin/aerys -d -c loader.php”, – “prod”: “vendor/bin/aerys -c loader.php” – }, – “config”: { – “process-timeout”: 0 – }, – – With all of this done, I could spin up a new server, and visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 just by typing: – composer dev -…
  • js”); – – $response-end(” – div class=’app’/div – script src='{$path}’/script – “); – } – – I realized I could keep creating functions that returned promises, and use them in this way to keep my code asynchronous.

Chris bootstraps a basic Stardew-Valley-like game in this game development with PHP post, using an async server, preprocessors, and ReactJS!
Continue reading “Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint”

⚛️ 🚀 Introducing React-Static — A progressive static-site framework for React!

  • How well that static site performs and how easily you can build that site is another story.ProsVery easy to get startedWell documentedConsSubpar developer experience for static functionality no hot-reloadingLarge per-page JS bundles, resulting in a lot of unnecessary duplicate code being downloaded.Difficult root component customizationDestructive routing.
  • We also knew that we needed to ditch built-in proprietary connectors ASAP; being able to get your data from anywhere is important, but the ability to use and access that data in your site is paramount.Most importantly, we needed a tool that would allow us to build things like an…
  • It’s insanely fast, touts fantastic SEO capabilities, and is probably the most React-friendly static-site library on the internet.Let’s get to it.How does it work?react-static starts by exporting a single JS bundle, which includes every template for your entire site.
  • To connect a component to this data, you use a convenient HOC called getRouteProps.The HTML files generated by react-static ensure that pages load instantly and are optimized for SEO.Once the page is loaded, your site invisibly and instantly transitions to your react app.At this point, navigating around your app will…
  • You’ve worked hard enough producing and organizing all of the data for your website, so the last thing you need is some superfluous GraphQL layer or custom component lifecycle lodging itself between your data and your pages.

At Nozzle.io, we take SEO, site performance, and user/developer experience very seriously. Over the last year, we’ve launched many sites using different static site tools that claim to solve these…
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I am Loving this Jelly Fish Splash React Animation see via @CodePen #ReactJs #React

  • You can apply CSS to your Pen from any stylesheet on the web.
  • Just put a URL to it here and we’ll apply it, in the order you have them, before the CSS in the Pen itself.
  • If the stylesheet you link to has the file extension of a preprocessor, we’ll attempt to process it before applying.
  • You can also link to another Pen here, and we’ll pull the CSS from that Pen and include it.
  • If it’s using a matching preprocessor, we’ll combine the code before preprocessing, so you can use the linked Pen as a true dependency.

Recreated https://dribbble.com/shots/2896850-Animated-DropSplash-Logo-Posibility with React and SVG…
Continue reading “I am Loving this Jelly Fish Splash React Animation see via @CodePen #ReactJs #React”

Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint

  • pre: – use Aerys\Router; – use App\Action\HomeAction; – – return (Router $router) = { – $router-route( – “GET”, “/”, new HomeAction – ); – }; – – And, from routes/api.
  • pre: – use Aerys\Router; – use (Router $router) = { – $router-route( – “GET”, “/api”, new HomeAction – ); – }; – – Though simple routes, these helped me to test the code in config.pre.
  • From App\Action; – – use Aerys\Request; – use Aerys\Response; – – class HomeAction – { – public function __invoke(Request $request, – Response $response) – { – $response-end(“hello world”); – } – } – – One final touch was to add shortcut scripts, to launch dev and prod versions of the…
  • From composer.json: – “scripts”: { – “dev”: “vendor/bin/aerys -d -c loader.php”, – “prod”: “vendor/bin/aerys -c loader.php” – }, – “config”: { – “process-timeout”: 0 – }, – – With all of this done, I could spin up a new server, and visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 just by typing: – composer dev -…
  • js”); – – $response-end(” – div class=’app’/div – script src='{$path}’/script – “); – } – – I realized I could keep creating functions that returned promises, and use them in this way to keep my code asynchronous.

Chris bootstraps a basic Stardew-Valley-like game in this game development with PHP post, using an async server, preprocessors, and ReactJS!
Continue reading “Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint”

Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint

  • pre:
    use Aerys\Router;
    use App\Action\HomeAction;

    return (Router $router) = {
    $router-route(
    “GET”, “/”, new HomeAction
    );
    };

    And, from routes/api.

  • pre:
    use Aerys\Router;
    use (Router $router) = {
    $router-route(
    “GET”, “/api”, new HomeAction
    );
    };

    Though simple routes, these helped me to test the code in config.pre.

  • From App\Action;

    use Aerys\Request;
    use Aerys\Response;

    class HomeAction
    {
    public function __invoke(Request $request,
    Response $response)
    {
    $response-end(“hello world”);
    }
    }

    One final touch was to add shortcut scripts, to launch dev and prod versions of the Aerys server.

  • From composer.json:
    “scripts”: {
    “dev”: “vendor/bin/aerys -d -c loader.php”,
    “prod”: “vendor/bin/aerys -c loader.php”
    },
    “config”: {
    “process-timeout”: 0
    },

    With all of this done, I could spin up a new server, and visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 just by typing:
    composer dev

    Setting Up the Front End
    “Ok, now that I’ve got the PHP side of things relatively stable; how am I going to build the ReactJS files?

  • js”);

    $response-end(”
    div class=’app’/div
    script src='{$path}’/script
    “);
    }

    I realized I could keep creating functions that returned promises, and use them in this way to keep my code asynchronous.

Chris bootstraps a basic Stardew-Valley-like game in this game development with PHP post, using an async server, preprocessors, and ReactJS!
Continue reading “Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint”

JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functions – LeanJS – Medium

JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functions  #react #arrowfunctions #es6 #javascript #reactjs

  • JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functionsArrow functions are an awesome ES6 language feature for a number of reasons, but we believe there are 3 key reasons they really shine:They are more conciseThey allow for implicit returnsThey get their “this” value from the context, meaning it comes from the callerLet’s look at some ES5 vs ES6 code:In the above code example we compare the ES5 and ES6 way of grabbing some values from an array of objects.More ConciseThe most striking thing is the amount of code, less code means less probability of introducing errors.
  • Secondly it’s obvious that our arrow function has improved readability here, it’s also more declarative.
  • Being concise and declarative with code is especially important when working in teams, it saves time and improves outcomes.Implicit returnsThe ability to return values implicitly builds upon the first point, we no longer need to add extra syntax such as the {} and return keyword if they are not needed.
  • So context is simply the one who is calling the function.If this isn’t clear, have a play with the code yourself here: why is getting the “this” value from the context useful?Before we had to bind our functions explicitly to make sure they had the right “this” value:We can of course continue doing this, but now we have a more concise way of doing the same thing:Summing upUsing arrow functions allows us to use a more concise and declarative syntax while eliminating the need for us to bind them explicitly.
  • There are of course a few more things to know about arrow functions which are beyond the scope of this post.

Arrow functions are an awesome ES6 language feature for a number of reasons, but we believe there are 3 key reasons they really shine: In the above code example we compare the ES5 and ES6 way of…
Continue reading “JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functions – LeanJS – Medium”

Experimenting with React Native & Expo’s Audio API

  • This year, we’re working on a complete refresh (Winds 2.0) that will introduce podcast support, enhanced social functionality, native iOS and Android applications, and much more.
  • With that, we have decided to use React Native to support our iOS and Android builds – a framework that will allow our development team to write applications that target multiple operating systems, with pure JavaScript.
  • We decided to build an audio player for iOS and Android with Expo’s powerful audio API and, of course, React Native.
  • Without React Native and the help of Expo, we would not have been able to target multiple operating systems in the timeframe that we have allotted and we would have to work with two separate codebases.
  • By experimenting and building a fully functional proof of concept, we’re now one step closer to Winds 2.0, and couldn’t be happier to announce that the code is 100% open-source on GitHub.

Stream is hiring Go, Python, and Machine Learning Engineers. Join our team and help powers the feeds for more than 200 million end users!
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