Mobx and React intro: syncing the UI with the app state using observable and observer

  • Our actions now consist of simple mutations to our observable state.
  • Exploit the separation of concern by moving all the state out of the components into a separate store or state.
  • Even more important is that we now have established a separation of concern between the observable state and the component that reacts with.
  • There is state marked with observable, and there are components which automatically derive from it, marked by observer.
  • MobX is a general purpose FRP library that provides the means to derive, for example, a React based user interface automatically from the state and keep it synchronized.

Read the full article, click here.


@kentcdodds: “”Mobx and React intro: syncing the UI with the app state” on @eggheadio by @mweststrate #eggheadADay 🆓 #ReactJS ⚛”


Applications are driven by state. Many things, like the user interface, should always be consistent with that state.
[MobX](https://mobxjs.github.io/mobx) is a general purpose FRP library that provides the means to derive, for example, a React based user interface automatically from the state and keep it synchronized.

The net result of this approach is that writing applications becomes really straight-forward and boilerplate free.


Mobx and React intro: syncing the UI with the app state using observable and observer

Thinking in React

Thinking in @reactjs with a bunch of @jsfiddle examples –

  • Use the props to filter the rows in ProductTable and set the values of the form fields in SearchBar .
  • Step 1: Break the UI into a component hierarchy #
  • Find a common owner component (a single component above all the components that need the state in the hierarchy).
  • If you’re familiar with the concept of state , don’t use state at all to build this static version.
  • If you can’t find a component where it makes sense to own the state, create a new component simply for holding the state and add it somewhere in the hierarchy above the common owner component.

Read the full article, click here.


@oskar: “Thinking in @reactjs with a bunch of @jsfiddle examples –”


React is, in my opinion, the premier way to build big, fast Web apps with JavaScript. It has scaled very well for us at Facebook and Instagram.


Thinking in React

Announcing Reactive Trader Cloud

  • Announcing Reactive Trader Cloud
  • Reactive Trader Cloud is a demo client-server FX trading application.
  • To launch Reactive Trader in our demo environment, click .
  • The backend is composed of a set of services which can be scaled, deployed and upgraded independently.
  • Instead of using HTTP, the client connects to the backend using Websockets and since we have a number of services, we decided to use a messaging gateway to act as a broker: this allows the client to establish a single connection to the backend and the broker is used to route messages to the correct service instance or to the correct client.

Read the full article, click here.


@AdaptiveLimited: “Reactive Trader Cloud released, #reactjs front-end, backend on #Kubernetes, all open source!”


In April 2014 we gave a talk at React Conf London on Reactive user interfaces and open-sourced Reactive Trader, a demo app we used to demonstrate the different concepts we highlighted in the talk. The talk was focused on UIs so we put most of our effort into the front-end and built a very simple monolithic backend to simulate the different flows and failure scenarios.


Announcing Reactive Trader Cloud