Advanced React Patterns — Exclusive Workshop

  • Making React components that can be used in multiple places is not hard.
  • What is hard is when the use cases differ.
  • Without the right patterns, you can find yourself with a highly complex component that requires a lot of configuration props and way too many if statements.

Join Kent C. Dodds and learn how to master React components.
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React State From the Ground Up

#ReactJS State From the Ground Up #JavaScript

  • State, in React, is a plain JavaScript object that allows you keep track of a component’s data.
  • The initial state of the App component has been set to a state object which contains the key username, and its value using .
  • Initializing a component state can get as complex as what you can see here: – – An initialized state can be accessed in the method, as I did above.
  • Your component should look like this; – – A state can be passed as props from a parent to the child component.
  • This method will be used to update the state of the component.

As you begin to learn React, you will be faced with understanding what state is. State is hugely important in React, and perhaps a big reason you’ve looked into using React in the first place. Let’s take a stab at understanding what state is and how it works. What is State? State, in React, is a plain JavaScript
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React Tutorial: A Comprehensive Guide to learning React.js in 2018

  • These components are defined either in pure JavaScript or they can be defined in what the React team calls “JSX”.
  • The reason the React team went with this approach is because, since the virtual DOM is a JavaScript representation of the actual DOM, React can keep track of the difference between the current virtual DOM(computed after some data changes), with the previous virtual DOM (computed befores some data changes).
  • In more layman’s terms, because manipulating the actual DOM is slow, React is able to minimize manipulations to the actual DOM by keeping track of a virtual DOM and only updating the real DOM when necessary and with only the necessary changes.
  • The process looks something like this, – – Some user event which changes the state of your app → Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.
  • Signal to notify our app some data has changed→ Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.

Continue reading “React Tutorial: A Comprehensive Guide to learning React.js in 2018”

Introduction To Redux

  • Before you start reading this article, I will suggest you read the first part of this Redux series to have a basic understanding of Redux features and functionalities, – – The events happening in the application are called actions.
  • There are 3 core benefits to having immutable state – – To change the store, you dispatch an action that is ultimately handled by a reducer.
  • A reducer is a function that takes state and an action and returns a new state.
  • When the store is created, Redux calls the reducers and uses their return values as an initial state.
  • In this article, we saw what actions, store, and reducers are in Redux.

In this article, we will see what Actions, Store and Reducers are,.
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A Comprehensive Guide to React.js in 2018

  • These components are defined either in pure JavaScript or they can be defined in what the React team calls “JSX”.
  • The reason the React team went with this approach is because, since the virtual DOM is a JavaScript representation of the actual DOM, React can keep track of the difference between the current virtual DOM(computed after some data changes), with the previous virtual DOM (computed befores some data changes).
  • In more layman’s terms, because manipulating the actual DOM is slow, React is able to minimize manipulations to the actual DOM by keeping track of a virtual DOM and only updating the real DOM when necessary and with only the necessary changes.
  • The process looks something like this, – – Some user event which changes the state of your app → Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.
  • Signal to notify our app some data has changed→ Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.

This is the original guide for learning to build apps with React.js. Recently upgraded to support React 16.3 and friends.
Continue reading “A Comprehensive Guide to React.js in 2018”

React Tutorial: A Comprehensive Guide to learning React.js in 2018

  • These components are defined either in pure JavaScript or they can be defined in what the React team calls “JSX”.
  • The reason the React team went with this approach is because, since the virtual DOM is a JavaScript representation of the actual DOM, React can keep track of the difference between the current virtual DOM(computed after some data changes), with the previous virtual DOM (computed befores some data changes).
  • In more layman’s terms, because manipulating the actual DOM is slow, React is able to minimize manipulations to the actual DOM by keeping track of a virtual DOM and only updating the real DOM when necessary and with only the necessary changes.
  • The process looks something like this, – – Some user event which changes the state of your app → Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.
  • Signal to notify our app some data has changed→ Re-render virtual DOM -> Diff previous virtual DOM with new virtual DOM -> Only update real DOM with necessary changes.

Continue reading “React Tutorial: A Comprehensive Guide to learning React.js in 2018”

Force a React Component to Re-Render

  • The beauty of React components is that they automagically render and update based on a change in or ; simply update the state from any place and suddenly your UI element updates — awesome!
  • There may be a case, however, where you simply want to brute force a fresh render of a React component.
  • Note:  In most cases you should never force a React component to re-render; re-rendering should always be done based on state or props changes.
  • Nonetheless, I don’t judge and there may be a case where you legitimately need to force a React component to re-render so let’s have it!
  • There are multiple ways to force a React component render but they are essentially the same.

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Lifecycle with React’s FunctionComponent

Lifecycle with #ReactJS Function Component

  • I’m thinking about doing something about it and this article is about how to do it.
  • For such reasons, it is often easier for people to use “Stateless FunctionalComponent”, but as a disadvantage in creating applications, “Stateless FunctionalComponent” alone can’t handle “lifecycle”.
  • “hocFactotry” is the name of the function that is the factory of HOC (HigherOrderComponent), W is the React component passed to the argument, and E is the React component of the return value.
  • As the number of components taking this form increases, the class declaration and render become boilerplates.
  • Functions related to life cycle are only a few.

Hello. I’m Sosuke Suzuki of Boostnote maintainer.
Boostnote is written in React.
Boostnote has been passed time since the development, and there are components that are bloated in many places.
Thanks to contributors as well, those components are getting better than before, but they are being Unobtrusive.
I’m thinking about doing something about it and this article is about how to do it.
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Code Splitting with React and React Router

Code Splitting with React and React Router  #reactjs #React #reactrouter

  • Code splitting has gained popularity recently for its ability to allow you to split your app into separate bundles your users can progressively load.
  • In this post we’ll take a look at not only what code splitting is and how to do it, but also how to implement it with React Router.
  • You already split your app into different routes, so adding in code splitting on top of that feels pretty natural.
  • Instead of thinking about code splitting as splitting your app up by its routes, you should think of it as splitting your app up by its components ( s are just components, after all).
  • You already know how to dynamically import modules with , now you just need to figure out which components in your app you can hold off downloading until your user needs them.

Code splitting has gained popularity recently for its ability to allow you to split your app into separate bundles your users can progressively load. In this post we’ll take a look at not only what code splitting is and how to do it, but also how to implement it with React Router.
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Introducing Immer: Immutability the easy way – Hacker Noon

  • The producer function receives one argument, the draft, which is a proxy to the current state you passed in.
  • The currentState will be untouched during this process.Because immer uses structural sharing, and our example producer above didn’t modify anything, the next state above is simply the state we started with.Let’s take look at what happens when we start modifying the draft in our producer.
  • It is not too bad in this simple case, but this process has to be repeated for every action, and on every level in which we want modify something.We have to make sure to return the existing state if the reducer doesn’t do anythingWith Immer, we only need to reason…
  • Both the original reducer and the new one behave exactly the same.No strings attachedThe idea to produce the next immutable state by modifying a temporarily draft isn’t new.
  • This will create a new function that will execute the producer when it’s passed in a state.

Immutable, structurally shared data structures are a great paradigm for storing state. Especially when combined with an event-sourcing architecture. However, there is a cost to pay. In a language…
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