Beyond React 16: Time Slicing and Suspense API

  • The latest release of ReactJS which is React 16 ships with a lot of features such as , , , and many others.
  • A sneak peek into new features coming to React was demoed by the creator of Redux and React core team member, Dan Abramov at JSConf Iceland, 2018.
  • Making it easier for developers to build great user experiences using ReactJS has always been the goal of the ReactJS team.
  • Time-slicing allows ReactJS, which now runs on React Fiber, to split computations of updates on children components into chunks during idle callbacks and rendering work is spread out over multiple frames.
  • Besides the steps shown in this section, the guide also shows: – – I’m overwhelmed by the engagement of React core team members with members of the JavaScript community in landing new features in React.

Time Slicing, Suspense and the Fetcher API are new features and concepts that will land soonest in stable releases of ReactJS. Learn how they work.
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Clean Code vs. Dirty Code: React Best Practices

Clean code vs. dirty code: React best practices  #ReactJS

  • This article will focus on clean code practices as they apply to modern React software development.
  • Many React developers rely on Jest for a zero-configuration test runner and to produce code coverage reports.
  • And don’t discount the “rewrite factor” and time spent fixing comments from code reviews.
  • The advantage of letting React set your prop defaults, however, is that it produces more efficient code, defaults props in a based lifecycle component, as well as allows your default values to be checked against .
  • For example, the following component is ripe for converting to an SFC. – – The clean version clears a lot of the screen clutter of the dirty version.

Clean code is a consistent style of programming that makes your code easier to write, read, and maintain. Discover how to make your React code cleaner using easy-to-follow examples.
Continue reading “Clean Code vs. Dirty Code: React Best Practices”

Clean Code vs. Dirty Code: React Best Practices

Clean #Code vs. Dirty Code: #ReactJS Best Practices:  by @donavon #JavaScript

  • This article will focus on clean code practices as they apply to modern React software development.
  • Many React developers rely on Jest for a zero-configuration test runner and to produce code coverage reports.
  • And don’t discount the “rewrite factor” and time spent fixing comments from code reviews.
  • The advantage of letting React set your prop defaults, however, is that it produces more efficient code, defaults props in a based lifecycle component, as well as allows your default values to be checked against .
  • For example, the following component is ripe for converting to an SFC. – – The clean version clears a lot of the screen clutter of the dirty version.

Clean code is a consistent style of programming that makes your code easier to write, read, and maintain. Discover how to make your React code cleaner using easy-to-follow examples.
Continue reading “Clean Code vs. Dirty Code: React Best Practices”