5 best libraries for making AJAX calls in React

Are you looking to make ajax calls in React?  #react #reactjs #javascript

  • One of the questions many React beginners ask: “What’s the React way to fetch data from the server” or “How should I make AJAX calls in React”?
  • So, in this article I will try to answer this basic question and list down 5 simple libraries for making AJAX calls in React.
  • In the former, official React tutorial, they use jQuery to fetch data from the server.
  • Here is how a simple API call is made, with jQuery: – – P.S. Snippet is from React’s former official tutorial.
  • However, jQuery is a big library with many functionalities – So, it doesn’t make sense to use it just for making API calls (Unless you are already using it for a bunch of other tasks).

I have been working with React for the last two years. One of the questions many React beginners ask: "What’s the React way to fetch data from the ser.
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YAWP!

Join #ReactJS + #MobX + YAWP in a single app:  #JavaScript #frontend

  • One common stack that I’ve been using to build apps is the React + MOBX + YAWP!
  • Now we create a form to edit products.
  • create-react-app react-yawp mv react-yawp web cd web npm install yawp –save npm install mobx –save npm install mobx-react –save
  • Just notice that everytime you type a letter the product will be automatically persisted to the server.
  • baseUrl ( ‘http://localhost:8080/api’ ); }); class Product extends yawp ( ‘/products’ ) { constructor ( attrs ) { super (); extendObservable ( this , attrs ); observe ( this , () => this .

One common stack that I’ve been using to build apps is the React + MOBX + YAWP! combo.

Why?

React (web or native) takes care of the UI rendering/update
MOBX makes my stores reactive to changes
YAWP! objects integrate nicely with MOBX

In this simple tutorial I’ll show you how to create a reactive API to automatically save
products to the server as you type.

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Introducing Twenty Sixteen React and NodeifyWP

This looks nifty. @10up introducing NodeifyWP and Twenty Sixteen rebuild w/ #reactjs #Nodejs

  • JavaScript and Node.js are used to create isomorphic applications, since JavaScript runs natively in the web browser and is the foundation for server-side Node.js.
  • Since WordPress runs on PHP, it can’t be used in conjunction with an important breakthrough: isomorphic applications .
  • Since we can’t run PHP in the web browser, we have a few options for creating JavaScript-powered “app-like” experiences in WordPress.
  • By using popular, new Node.js technologies, we think that developers can make first class, “app-like” experiences with the web’s most popular CMS, WordPress.
  • Isomorphic web applications run the same code on the server and client (web browser), providing the flexibility, extensibility, and consistency to build the most modern “app-like” experiences on the web.


As web technologies and mobile devices improve and global internet speeds increase, consumers increasingly expect taps and clicks to deliver results nearly instantaneously; the “app-like” experience has become an expectation in web browsers. To this end, we’ve seen huge strides forward in web platforms and frameworks.
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Snapshot Testing: Use With Care

  • When writing Snapshot Tests that are intended to stick around, you need to be careful to write really solid test descriptions, because the body of the test no longer communicates anything about what’s important about the test case.
  • During future runs, the test will compare the latest JSON with the snapshot file.
  • Snapshot Testing in Jest was designed to make it easy to test React components, but it can be used for more than that.
  • The ability to quickly update a snapshot when it changes makes for a nicer, faster workflow.
  • It is definitely worth experimenting with Jest’s Snapshot Testing feature.

Snapshot Testing has been getting a fair bit of attention recently with some new tool support that makes it easy to use. But is that a good thing? …
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5 best libraries for making AJAX calls in React

5 best libraries for making AJAX calls in #ReactJS:

  • Then( function ( response ) { // perform setState }).catch( function ( error ) { //Some error occurred }); }
  • var request = new XMLHttpRequest(); request.open( ‘GET’ , ‘/api/content’ , true ); request.onload = function ( ) { if ( this .status >= 200 && this .status < 400 ) { var data = JSON .parse( this .response); } else { console .error( 'Response received and there was an error' ); } }; request.onerror = function ( ) { console .
  • I doesn’t make much sense to load jQuery just to make Ajax calls, and it looks as if the trend is not to use jQuery anymore.
  • So if you have to ever test async functions like that, Fetch gets my vote.
  • This is a quick & dirty way to make AJAX calls.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “5 best libraries for making AJAX calls in #ReactJS:”


I have been working with React for last two years. One of the questions many React beginners ask is that "What’s the React way to fetch data from serv.


5 best libraries for making AJAX calls in React