Protected routes and authentication with React Router v4

Protected routes and authentication with React Router v4  #ReactJS

  • In this post we’ll break down the “Redirects (Auth)” example on the React Router documentation to learn how to create authenticated routes (routes that only certain users can access based on their authentication status) using React Router.
  • It would be nice if, just like React Router gives us a component, they also gave us a component which would render the only if the user was authenticated.
  • So now what we’re doing is when the user authenticates, we change to true which causes a re-render and then renders the component taking the user to the route.
  • First, inside of our component when we redirect the user for not being authenticated, we’ll need to pass along the current route they’re trying to visit so we can come back to it after they authenticate.
  • Now we need to modify our component so that if the user was redirected there from a previous route, once they authenticate, they’re taken back to that original route.

Protected routes are an important part of any web application. In this post we’ll break down the “Redirects (Auth)” example on the React Router documentation to learn how to create authenticated routes (routes that only certain users can access based on their authentication status) using React Router.
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Implementing redux and react-router v4 in your react app

  • Then we created our main reducer function inside it, we checked for different action types and updated our reducer state accordingly.
  • Let’s install redux-thunk

    Let’s edit our index.js to make use of our new redux store.

  • Inside your project directory

    Input preview is a component which will render an input component which on update will update our reducer message.

  • let’s pass an onChange function to input tag inside your App.js create a method called _onChange

    Above on every onchange, we dispatched setMessage action with the new value of our input tag.

  • So in above code, we called the _onChange function on every change to update the value of message in reducer.

Okay so without further ado let’s start by installing redux and react-redux into our project…
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All About React Router 4

  • In some ways, earlier versions of React Router resembled our traditional mental model of what an application router “should be” by placing all the routes rules in one place.
  • Here are some JavaScript concepts you need to be familiar with for this article:

    If you’re the type that prefers jumping right to a working demo, here you go:

    Earlier versions of React Router centralized the routing rules into one place, keeping them separate from layout components.

  • For the first, let’s modify our to accommodate the browsing and profile pages for users and products:

    While this does technically work, taking a closer look at the two user pages starts to reveal the problem:

    New API Concept: is given to any component rendered by .

  • Here’s a different approach which is better:

    Instead of four routes corresponding to each of the user’s and product’s pages, we have two routes for each section’s layout instead.

  • For example, both these console logs will output the same value when the browser path is `/users`:

    ES2015 Concept: is being destructured at the parameter level of the component function.

This post is going to dig into to React Router 4, how it’s so different from previous React Router versions, and why that is. My intentions for this article aren’t to rehash the already well-written documentation for React Router 4. I will cover the most common API concepts, but the real focus is on patterns and strategies that I’ve found to be successful.
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Making React Native Navigator Work Like NavigatorIOS

Making React Native Navigator Work Like NavigatorIOS #reactnative #react #node

  • I’ll show you how to set up the Navigator component to work as simply as NavigatorIOS. I think the React Native documentation is lacking with regards to this.
  • If you’ve looked at the React Native documentation for the Navigator component, you’ll find things aren’t so simple.
  • (The navigation bar can be hidden by giving the route object a property of navigationBarHidden set to true .
  • // app/components/shared/Navbar.js import React from ‘react’; import Icon from ‘react-native-vector-icons/Octicons’ import { StyleSheet, Text, View, TouchableOpacity } from ‘react-native’; var Navbar = React.createClass({ onLeftButtonPress() { this.props.onLeftButtonPress(); }, onRightButtonPress() { this.props.onRightButtonPress(); }, render() { var renderLeftButton = () => { if (!this.props.leftButtonHidden) { return ( ) } else { return ( ) } }
  • Making React Native Navigator Work Like NavigatorIOS

Use Navigator to keep your apps cross-platform
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React, routing, and data fetching – Jimmy Jia – Medium

#ReactJS, routing, and data fetching:

  • Performing data loading in parallel across route boundaries would require a route component to be explicitly aware of all of its possible child route components, and would limit reusability.
  • The ideal solution is to fetch all data and code in parallel after navigating to a new set of routes.
  • The getData method can return a promise that resolves to the remote data for the route.
  • After the code bundles have been loaded, we can use the Router middleware API to fetch data for all the routes in parallel.
  • In React Router v2 and v3, we can use the getComponent method on routes to load split-out code bundles in parallel.

In React applications at scale, routing, data fetching, and code splitting are naturally linked. The upcoming React Router v4 sacrifices the ability to optimally handle data fetching and code…
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desklamp

  • To create a nested route (like /home/homey ), simply nest the component inside of the component within and your route will be created .
  • Container gives you the container component with all the application state.
  • The function call returns the current state object.
  • Desklamp allows you to keep your state in a single state object.
  • // Child components become your routable urls

clean routing and state container for react
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