Reactjs vs Vuejs – What to Choose? #Vuejs #Reactjs #js

Reactjs vs Vuejs - What to Choose?
#Vuejs #Reactjs #js

  • Pros and cons of vue js
    Vue.js – is a JavaScript-framework that uses the MVVM pattern for creating user interfaces based on data models through reactive binding data.
  • A developer might not know how to use it but he should have heard about Vue js, because the framework became popular in past few years the number of use the words “Vue js” and “Vue.js” in Google trend in 2016 was more than in four times higher comparing to 2015.
  • Advantages of vue js:

    Having borrowed from older frameworks, such as Angular and React only the best, Vue.js stands the perfect balance between readability, maintainability of code and the pleasure of it, this code, writing.

  • From React Vue.js took a component approach, props, one-way data flow for the component hierarchy, performance, the ability to render on the backend and understanding the importance of proper state management.
  • This makes it easy to add the Vue library to the project, like jQuery.All this is possible in the React library, but generally the code written on React relies more on JSX and on the features of ES.

Both React.js and Vue.js have benefits and disadvantages, that may confuse a potential client at first. We’re going to make their comparison in this article.

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#Vuejs #Reactjs #js”

Maximizing Debuggability with Redux – LogRocket

Making #Redux apps easier to debug #reactjs #webdev via @LogRocketJS

  • By using front end logging tools like LogRocket, developers can easily understand and fix tricky bugs in production by reviewing the actions and state changes leading up to a bug.While this information is immediately useful in any Redux app, there is a lot more we can achieve by architecting an app with logging in mind.
  • When debugging issues, we can dig into this state object to see information on in-flight requests, queryCount (if we’re polling on a query), and timings.Storing this information in Redux is critical, since it puts full context on all network activity in the Redux logs.Rolling your own data fetching “framework”If you’d prefer a simpler approach, you can roll your own data fetching “framework” by simply dispatching explicit actions when querying and receiving data from the network.For example, lets say we’re building a blogging app.
  • This would then update state appropriately to:postsQuery: { url: ‘api.blog.com/posts’, isPending: true, data: […],}This example is far from thorough, but the idea is that by being explicit with Redux actions for each part of the request lifecycle, it becomes easy to debug any potential race condition or network error.Handling other sources of non-determinismIn addition to network fetching, there are lots of other sources of non-determinism that can cause bugs.
  • For example:myWebSocket.onmessage = function (event) { store.dispatch({ type: ‘BLOG_POST_UPDATE_RECEIVED’, payload: event, } }That way, when looking at the Redux logs for an error or user-reported issue, we can see all the data that was received over the websocket and, crucially, relate it in time to other redux actions and network requests.Local StorageOften, an app needs to read from local storage when it first starts up.
  • Once you get the library set up, you’ll see a new key in your Redux store called routing with information on the current router state.In addition, react-router-redux dispatches actions like @@router/LOCATION_CHANGE when its state changes.Also of note is that using react-router-redux lets you rewind router state when time-traveling in redux-devtools, since its state its state is derived from the state in Redux.A note about local vs Redux stateI don’t want to get into the debate on local vs Redux state here, but production Redux logging does change the calculus of this decision in some cases.

In my last blog post, Redux Logging in Production, I discussed one of the most important benefits of using Redux — debuggability. By using front end logging tools like LogRocket, developers can…
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Game Development with ReactJS and PHP: How Compatible Are They? — SitePoint

  • I added my recent work with PHP preprocessors to make things cleaner, and made the first couple of endpoints:
    $host = new 8080);

    $host-use($router = = = process = process is from config.pre

    I decided to use Aerys for the HTTP and Web Socket portions of the application.

  • Finally I added pre/short-closures, both to handle the custom syntax in config.pre and the short closures I planned on using after…
    Then I set about creating routes files:
    use Aerys\Router;
    use App\Action\HomeAction;

    return (Router $router) = {
    $router-route(
    “GET”, “/”, new HomeAction
    );
    };

    This is from routes/web.

  • Finally, I created two (similar) actions:
    namespace App\Action;

    use Aerys\Request;
    use Aerys\Response;

    class HomeAction
    {
    public function __invoke(Request $request,
    Response $response)
    {
    $response-end(“hello world”);
    }
    }

    This is from final touch was to add shortcut scripts, to launch dev and prod versions of the Aerys server:
    “scripts”: {
    “dev”: “vendor/bin/aerys -d -c loader.php”,
    “prod”: “vendor/bin/aerys -c loader.php”
    },
    “config”: {
    “process-timeout”: 0
    },

    This is from composer.json

    With all of this done, I could spin up a new server, and visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 just by typing:
    composer dev

    Setting Up The Front-end
    “Ok, now that I’ve got the PHP side of things relatively stable; how am I going to build the ReactJS files?

  • I noticed Mix liked to create a manifest file, so I made a helper function to query it:
    use Amp\Coroutine;

    function mix($path) {
    $generator = () = {
    $manifest = yield $manifest = json_decode($manifest, true);

    if (isset($manifest[$path])) {
    return $manifest[$path];
    }

    throw new Exception(“{$path} not found”);
    };

    return new is from helpers.pre

    Aerys knew how to handle promises when they came in the form of $val = yield $promise, so I used Amp’s Promise implementation.

  • I found this relatively straightforward, with a new class:
    namespace App\Socket;

    use Aerys\Request;
    use Aerys\Response;
    use Aerys\Websocket;
    use Aerys\Websocket\Endpoint;
    use GameSocket implements Websocket
    {
    private $endpoint;
    private $connections = [];

    public function onStart(Endpoint $endpoint)
    {
    $this-endpoint = $endpoint;
    }

    public function onHandshake(Request $request,
    Response $response)
    {
    $origin = if ($origin !

Chris bootstraps a basic Stardew-Valley-like game in this game development with PHP post, using an async server, preprocessors, and ReactJS!
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Microservices with Docker, Flask, and React

  • In Part 3, we’ll add database migrations along with password hashing in order to implement token-based authentication to the users service with JSON Web Tokens (JWTs).
  • We’ll then turn our attention to the client and add React Router to the React app to enable client-side routing along with client-side authentication.
  • By the end of part 3, you should be able to…

    Check out the live app, running on EC2 – http://54.89.0.180/

    You can also test out the following endpoints…

In Part 3, we’ll add database migrations along with password hashing in order to implement token-based authentication to the users service with JSON Web Tokens (JWTs). We’ll then turn our attention to the client and add React Router to the React app to enable client-side routing along with client-side authentication.
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ReactJS Authentication Tutorial, Part 2

ReactJS Authentication Tutorial, Part 2  #web_dev #front_end #cli #reactjs #Programming

  • The component is pulling data from an API, so it needs a way of holding that data.
  • In the constructor, we define the initial state as seen in the code below:

    In the method, we call the method we exported from the helper file and set state as seen below:

    Now, we took advantage of one of the ReactJS lifecycle hooks, .

  • So, we invoked the method in the hook as seen below:

    All we are trying to do is tell ReactJS to load the data from the API immediately when the component gets rendered.

  • Finally, we rendered the component with the ReactJS method.
  • This renders the root component in the div, which is the starting point of our ReactJS application.

We continue our series on creating an authenticated ReactJS application by looking at how to setup our front-end with the help of Facebook’s CLI tool.
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Become a Professional React Developer

  • React is completely transforming Front-End Development.
  • Master this powerful UI library from Facebook with Udacity and the experts from React Training.
  • Get notified when the React Nanodegree program launches.
  • To succeed in this program, you need to have experience with building front-end web applications with:

    You should have familiarity with the following:

React is completely transforming Front-End Development. Master this powerful UI library from Facebook with Udacity and the experts from React Training.
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WEEK -3 Updates [15th June — 22th June] – Reuben Varghese – Medium

WEEK -3 Updates [15th June — 22th June]  #react #gsoc #openmrs #weekly #addons #reactjs

  • WEEK -3 Updates [15th June — 22th June]Yet another week into Gsoc @ OpenMRS and things and the fun just keeps increasing!
  • I get to learn new things , implement things in a smart way as opposed to the conventional way.This week I had 2 tasks:a) Improved Tagging supportb) Display compatibility of the module with current installed OpenMRS versionUnfortunately out of the above 2 tasks , I am still working of the 2nd task so I guess I can say that this week’s work wasn’t as per my expectations.Anyway moving on to the updates of last week, I succesfully implemented the tagging mechanism.
  • Now, a user can click on a tag and all modules with that tag will get grouped together.How did I go about it?Firstly, I created the Rest API for it using spring .
  • On clicking the tag, basically the UI calls the Rest API which returns the data i.e. the list of modules with same tag.
  • This data is then inflated into the UI with the help of React router which does the job of connecting the front end to the back end.OUTPUT:Fig 1: Clickable tag as seen in the grey labelFig 2: List of modules with the tag: “form-entry”Conclusion:Not a very productive week Gsoc @OpenMRS, but optimistic about week 4!

Yet another week into Gsoc @ OpenMRS and things and the fun just keeps increasing! I get to learn new things , implement things in a smart way as opposed to the conventional way. Unfortunately out of…
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