React Router DOM v4 Tutorial (with Examples) • techiediaries

#React Router DOM v4 Tutorial (with Examples)  #reactjs #javascript #Programming #coding

  • The < Route > component is one of the most useful components of React Router v4 and the idea behind it is simple, wherever you want to render something when only there is a match with the location’s path you can use a Route component.
  • We can just append the name to be used for the variable plus a colon : to the end of the route’s path, for example: – – When there is a path match an object which has the following properties will be created and passed to the component: – -…
  • First we import the necessary routing components such as Route and BrowserRouter – – Next we create the base layout component, besides common HTML tags we also use React Router v4 components Link and Route: – – Next we create our pages: – – And finally we create the App…
  • In our example app we used the prop exact in the Route for component HomePage – – That’s because React Router v4 uses inclusive routing instead of exclusive routing used by React Router v3 so without exact property the home component will be rendered with all other components, for example…
  • You can also navigate inside your React application using methods from the history object, for example: – – Which are equivalent to: – – Whenever you want to redirect to another location, you can place component which is when rendered will redirect to the location specified in to prop that…

In this tutorial we are going to get you started with react-router-dom using an example React application showing you how to use different concepts such as Link and NavLink for creating links (instead of anchors) in the React way, Switch and exact for enabling exclusive routing and browser routing history.
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React Top 10 Articles For the Past Month (v.Oct 2017)

React Top 10 Articles For the Past Month (v.Oct 2017). @reactjs #JavaScript

  • React Top 10 Articles For the Past Month (v.Oct 2017)For the past month, we’ve ranked nearly 1,200 React articles to pick the Top 10 stories that can help advance your career.
  • (0.8% chance to be picked in the list)Topics in this list: Progressive Web App, Preact, Redux, Server Side Rendering, Structure, GraphQL, AWS, Component, AnimationOpen source of the month is included at the end.Top 10 for JavaScript, Node, Angular are posted separately in the publicationMybridge AI ranks articles based on the…
  • This is a competitive list and you’ll find the experience and techniques shared by the React leaders useful.A React And Preact Progressive Web App Performance Case Study: Treebo.

For the past month, we’ve ranked nearly 1,200 React articles to pick the Top 10 stories that can help advance your career. (0.8% chance to be picked in the list)
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Case study of SSR with React in a large e-commerce app – Jakob Lind

Case study of SSR with React in a large e-commerce app  #ReactJS

  • In this case study you will learn: – – In this case study, I present how we have implemented SSR (server side rendering) with React in an e-commerce application for one of Norway’s largest telco brands Telia.
  • What we have learned over the 3 years we have worked with the app is that keeping things simple helps a lot when implementing and maintaining an SSR solution.
  • The theory of SSR is pretty simple: you just render your React components on the backend and send the generated HTML to the client.
  • We create our Redux store with the initialState on the backend like this: – – The initialState variable is also sent to the frontend in a global variable so that the client side app gets the exact same state prefetched.
  • Here are some examples of variables that we guard against on server side: – – The process for knowing when to add the guard is something like: – – We are also careful to only use dependencies that work with SSR.

Setting up SSR (server side rendering) with React is painful. There is no good overview or starting point. Instead, you have to gather pieces of information from googling and do your best to puzzle them together.
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Become a Professional React Developer

  • Sebastian Thrun invites you to enroll today in our new Intro to Self-Driving Cars Nanodegree program .
  • React is completely transforming Front-End Development.
  • To succeed in this program, you need to have experience with building front-end web applications with: – – You should have familiarity with the following:

React is completely transforming Front-End Development. Master this powerful UI library from Facebook with Udacity and the experts from React Training.
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Even Better Support for React in Flow – Flow – Medium

Even Better Support for #ReactJS in Flow:  by @calebmer #JavaScript

  • It is time to rethink how Flow models React.In Flow 0.53.0 we are changing how Flow models React and in doing this we can provide better types for higher-order components, strict typing for React children, and fixes for a host of bugs in Flow’s React support.The biggest change we are…
  • A React component in 0.53.0 looks like this:type Props = { foo: number,};type State = { bar: number,};class MyComponent extends React.ComponentProps, State { state = { bar: 42, }; render() { return this.props.foo + this.state.bar; }}When your component has no state, you only need to pass in a single type…
  • Without state your component definition would look like this:type Props = { foo: number,};class MyComponent extends React.ComponentProps { render() { return this.props.foo; }}If your component has default props then add a static defaultProps property:type Props = { foo: number,};class MyComponent extends React.ComponentProps { static defaultProps = { foo: 42, };…
  • For the React Router example above, you would type the Route component’s children as:type Props = { children: (data: { match: boolean }) = React.Node, path: string,};class Route extends React.ComponentProps { /* … */ }To learn more about typing React children read our documentation guide on the topic.The children prop…
  • Here is how you would type a simple higher-order component that injects a number prop, foo:function injectPropProps: {}( Component: React.ComponentType{ foo: number } Props,): React.ComponentTypeProps { return function WrapperComponent(props: Props) { return Component {…props} foo={42} /; };}class MyComponent extends React.Component{ a: number, b: number, foo: number,} {}const MyEnhancedComponent = injectProp(MyComponent);//…

The first version of Flow support for React was a magical implementation of React.createClass(). Since then, React has evolved significantly. It is time to rethink how Flow models React. In Flow 0.53…
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Visualization tool for #Reactjs, with support for Fiber, Router (v4), and Redux

  • If you’d like to build your own version of React Sight: – – If you have any additional questions send us a message at reactsight@gmail.com 🙂 – – Hover over nodes to see their state and props in the side panel.
  • We built React Sight because there are no tools on the market that give you a visual representation of the structure of your App.
  • When we were developing our own projects, we wished we had a way to see how everything was structured.
  • We wanted React Sight to be simple to use, which is why all you have to do is install a Chrome extension.
  • If you’re interested in joining the React Sight team as a contributor, feel free to message one of us directly.

React-Sight – Visualization tool for React, with support for Fiber, Router (v4), and Redux
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The Official Microsoft ASP.NET Site

CORE 2 and ANGULAR 4
☞ 
#angularjs #angular #js #react #js

  • The product(s) you are about to install leverage the Web Platform Installer (WebPI) for installation.
  • By downloading and using the Web Platform Installer (WebPI), you agree to the license terms and privacy statement for WebPI.
  • This installer will contact Microsoft over the Internet to retrieve product information.
  • WebPI uses the Microsoft Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP), which is turned on by default, see privacy statement for more information.
  • To view which software uses CEIP, see here.

Home of the Microsoft ASP.NET development community. Download Visual Studio, post to the forums, read ASP.NET blogs and learn about ASP.NET.
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