Get Rich Quick With React Context

Slides from my talk at #reactfinland about #reactjs context:

  • So when my advertising provider component is initialized, it constructs an internal advertising module with my configuration.
  • It configures my ad slots with my ad server.
  • When one of my advertising slot components mount, they call an activate function that is passed to them by the provider.
  • This causes my advertising module to tell the ad server: OK, go ahead and fill that slot with some advertising creative.
  • The ad server then uses a system called Prebid to make an online auction to sell the advertising space to the highest bidder.

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donavon/react-af – Next #reactjs features, today

donavon/react-af - Next #reactjs features, today

  • One problem that React component library developers face is that they don’t control the version of React that they run on — this is controlled by the consuming application.
  • emulates newer features of React on older versions, allowing developers to concentrate on the business problem and not the environment.
  • You can now code your library components as though they are running on a modern React (not all features supported… yet), even though your code may be running on an older version.
  • Here are the modern React features that you can use, even if yur code is running on older version of React 15 or React 16.
  • Starting with React 16.2, there is a new component that allows you to return multiple children.

GitHub is where people build software. More than 27 million people use GitHub to discover, fork, and contribute to over 80 million projects.
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@ZackArgyle 1. Start with plain React. 2. Lift state as needed. 3. Still feeling pain? Use Redux/Context/etc.

  • Currently, both components independently keep their values in the local state: – – However, we want these two inputs to be in sync with each other.
  • Since the props of both components are coming from the same parent component, the two inputs will always be in sync.
  • It will handle the change by modifying its own local state, thus re-rendering both inputs with the new values.
  • For example, if we enter 37 into the Celsius input, the state of the component will be: – – If we later edit the Fahrenheit field to be 212, the state of the will be: – – We could have stored the value of both inputs but it turns out…
  • The inputs stay in sync because their values are computed from the same state: – – Try it on CodePen.

Often, several components need to reflect the same changing data. We recommend lifting the shared state up to their closest common ancestor. Let’s see how this works in action.
Continue reading “@ZackArgyle 1. Start with plain React.
2. Lift state as needed.
3. Still feeling pain? Use Redux/Context/etc.”

More great #OpenSource from Lyft: Convert #ReactJS to #TypeScript with proper typing

More great #OpenSource from Lyft: Convert #ReactJS to #TypeScript with proper typing

  • Tests are organized in folder.
  • For each transform there is a folder that contains folders for each test case.
  • Each test case has and .
  • Pass with transform name and case name space separated to

react-javascript-to-typescript-transform – Convert React JavaScript code to TypeScript with proper typing
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React Portal – gitconnected

  • React PortalRender your a React component gets rendered in its parent DOM container, but in some cases you would need to render a component outside of parent/host DOM element.For example, in dropdowns, tooltips or modal windows, a child component/element may get hidden due to parent component’s overflow:hidden or zindex css.This can…
  • React 16 introduced the Portal which provides a method to render a component in a DOM node that exists outside of parent component.
  • Similar to how we render our React app into a DOM node by targeting its ID, we can do the same thing to render the portal.
  • Portals also allow event bubbling making it behave like a normal child node and propagate the event to parent component in react tree.Portal ExampleI have created a dropdown to show the scenario where we would need Portal.
  • One way to create a dropdown is using inline menu child component.

Normally a React component gets rendered in its parent DOM container, but in some cases you would need to render a component outside of parent/host DOM element. This can be fixed by rendering child…
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I’m happy to share a new version of React Input Handler! #reactjs #commit #push #unleash

I’m happy to share a new version of React Input Handler!



#reactjs #commit #push #unleash

  • ( ) } () { ( form label Fullname label input type name onChange { . }
  • label Are you a developer label input type name value onChange { . }
  • For example: – – input type name value onChange { . }
  • checked input type name value onChange { . }
  • input type name value onChange { . }

react-input-handler – ⚡️ Utility function to handle input changes in React.
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#reactjs #commit #push #unleash”

React Components Explained – codeburst

  • Something like thisimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { render () { return div This is a component /div }}class MyOtherComponent extends React.Component { render () { return ( div MyComponent / /div ) }}This way you are able to compose more complex and useful user interface for your…
  • Component’s render method return JSX which then use to create real HTML output which will be rendered in the browser.The interesting Thing about render method is that it runs every time when your component State or Props updates.
  • Let me show you a exampleimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; } render () { return div My name is {this.state.name} /div }}// if we render this component the output will beMy name is ManojIgnore the super(props) (out of…
  • Let’s see an example.class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; this.changeName = this.changeName.bind(this); } changeName () { this.setState({ name: “Your Name” }); } render () { return div onClick={this.changeName} My name is {this.state.name} /div }}In the above code we are telling our React…
  • You can run this code on jsFiddle here.PropsVisualise props as options that can be passed to a component to customize its functionality.For example, I have a heading component which renders a heading with subtitle.class MyHeading extends React.Component { render () { return div h1This is a heading/h1 pSubtitle/p /div }}If…

The simplest library I ever used in my life is React. As you know React is based upon component design. Everything in React is a component which makes it easy to reuse components frequently. You can…
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React v16.2.0: Improved Support for Fragments

React 16.2 is here:  - the biggest addition is support for

  • To make the authoring experience as convenient as possible, we’re adding syntactical support for fragments to JSX: – – In React, this desugars to a element, as in the example from the previous section.
  • Support for fragment syntax in JSX will vary depending on the tools you use to build your app.
  • Support for JSX fragments is available in Babel v7.0.0-beta.31 and above!
  • Upgrade to the latest TypeScript with the command: – – Flow support for JSX fragments is available starting in version 0.59!
  • A big thanks to everyone who filed issues, contributed to syntax discussions, reviewed pull requests, added support for JSX fragments in third party libraries, and more!

React 16.2 is now available! The biggest addition is improved support for returning multiple children from a component’s render method. We call this feature fragments:
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React Js Tutorial – React Component Lifecycle, State, Props #reactjs #javascript

  • Do you know what is meant by component lifecycle, state, props in React Js?
  • In this tutorial, you will learn about, – – The render method is the only required spec for the components.
  • If the component doesn’t need to render after state or props change then we can set it to false.
  • Every component has a state object and props object.
  • Let’s see the example of state and props below.

Learn about react lifecycle, state, props.Also, know the difference between state and props in this tutorial.Find out the complete react js tutorial here.
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Passing Functions to Components

  • Pass event handlers and other functions as props to child components: – – If you need to have access to the parent component in the handler, you also need to bind the function to the component instance (see below).
  • There are several ways to make sure functions have access to component attributes like and , depending on which syntax and build steps you are using.
  • In JavaScript, these two code snippets are not equivalent: – – Binding methods helps ensure that the second snippet works the same way as the first one.
  • Make sure you aren’t calling the function when you pass it to the component: – – Instead, pass the function itself (without parens): – – You can use an arrow function to wrap around an event handler and pass parameters: – – This is equivalent to calling : – -…
  • is a way of queuing a function to be executed in the browser at the optimal time for rendering performance.

If you need to have access to the parent component in the handler, you also need to bind the function to the component instance (see below).
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