How to Connect your React App to a REST API – codeburst

  • Today we are going to connect this app to an existing REST API and use the fetched data to display our previously created list of contacts.Over the whole series of articles, we’re going to build a functional contact list with React:Part 1 — How to Create a React App with create-react-appPart 2 — How…
  • This way, the app fetches contacts at the startup and fills our contact list with data.PreparationsIf you don’t have the source code of the previous part ready, you can clone it from GitHub, install the dependencies and start the appgit clone contacts-managergit checkout part-2npm installnpm startThe app is now available…
  • To begin, let’s install axios: In your root directory (where your package.json is) execute the following command line:npm i -S axiosNext, open your App.js and perform the following actions:add the componentDidMount lifecycle method to the App component.import axios from the just installed packageadd the axios GET request to componentDidMount to…
  • Since it is empty, it is the initial State object with a replaced “contacts” property.Finally — Set the new StateNow that we got our data, picked the relevant parts out of it and created a “new” State object, we store it in the State of the App call, puts the “newState” object as…
  • Also, you learned that if you want to fetch data from a server at the startup of the app, you’ll do it in componentDidMount in a suitable component.You also learned, how to set State and that you can pass an object or a function to setState.Last but not least, you’ve…

In the previous parts of this series you learned how to bootstrap a new React app with create-react-app and create a list component. Today we are going to connect this app to an existing REST API and…
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My Simple React Tutorial. – Jeffrey Doyle – Medium

My Simple React Tutorial.  #webdevelopment #react #reactjs #javascript #apps #reactjs

  • In this case, a state object might look like:state = {currentTime {hour: 0, minute: 0, second: 0}, alarms: [], timeZone: ‘PST’}Say again that you’re creating a component which represents a list of items stored in a table.
  • In this case you’re going to want to store the items in the list, maybe the size of the list, and also the label the list has all inside that components state.
  • Now some developers will say that i’m storing too much inside my state object, but personally I like to keep all of the relevant data to my component inside that components state.
  • Lets explore our example of the list of items component and see what it might look like:As you can see, the state is where all of our data is stored inside our component.
  • When addItem is called and it performs the setState function on the component, the components state will change, and thus trigger the component to re-render according to the new state object, thus including the new item in the list.

React is one of the most powerful Javascript frameworks around right now, this tutorial will introduce you to React, and tell you why you need to start using it right now. Let’s face it, if you’ve…
Continue reading “My Simple React Tutorial. – Jeffrey Doyle – Medium”

Livecoding: A choropleth in React.js

#Livecoding: A #choropleth in #Reactjs   by @dzone

  • You’re looking at a choropleth map of median household incomes in the United States that I built with React and D3v4.
  • Buffalo County in South Dakota is the poorest county in the US with a median household income of $21,658.
  • More about that later when we compare this median household data to that dataset of salaries in the software industry.
  • After loading our datasets – a TopoJSON of US counties and states (geo info) and a table of median household incomes per county – we start with a component.
  • It looks like this:

    With some setup and a bit of data loading, those two components create a choropleth map of median household incomes in the United States.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to normalize datasets in React.js, by creating a choropleth map of US counties, organized by median income. Read on for more!
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Introduction · Black Pixel Redux Handbook

Learn about writing Redux-powered apps with our team’s Redux Handbook:  #reactjs #gitbook

  • In simple terms, any data that may change ends up living in Redux, which then gets wired up to your React containers to provide the means to read from or write to your state object.
  • It is often used in combination with React to pull state out from the view layer into a single store.
  • Flux allows for either mutable or immutable data (although immutability is often encouraged); Redux mandates immutability.
  • The single store and immutable data allows for easy implementation of features such as simpler state hydration, snapshots, or recording/”time travel”.
  • An additional thing to consider is that your data should be represented in your state object in a normalized way.

Read the full article, click here.


@blackpixel: “Learn about writing Redux-powered apps with our team’s Redux Handbook: #reactjs #gitbook”


Redux is a state management library written by Dan Abramov. It is often used in combination with React to pull state out from the view layer into a single store. In simple terms, any data that may change ends up living in Redux, which then gets wired up to your React containers to provide the means to read from or write to your state object.


Introduction · Black Pixel Redux Handbook