Netlify: Deploy React Apps in less than 30 Seconds

  • Today Facebook announced their opinated boiler-plate for getting React projects started.
  • Deploy React Apps in less than 30 Seconds
  • Up until today, React has had no opinions on what to use with tooling, which has made deploying a unique problem to each project.
  • /build as your deploy folder and voila you have a production React app!
  • npm install -g create-react-app create-react-app hello-world cd hello_world npm run build npm install netlify-cli -g netlify deploy

Read the full article, click here.


@Netlify: “.@reactjs opinions are trending, have you thought about deploying a React app in less 30 seconds? We have…”


At Netlify we use React in production and are familiar with the challenges in deploying it to production as well. Up until today, React has had no opinions on what to use with tooling, which has made deploying a unique problem to each project.


Netlify: Deploy React Apps in less than 30 Seconds

You might not need React Router — Medium

  • I’m familiar with, there is no need in using nested routes as it’s done in RR.
  • /history’; function render(location) { /* Render React app, read on */ } render(history.getCurrentLocation()); // render the current URL history.listen(render); // render subsequent URLs
  • /routes’; const container = document.getElementById(‘root’); function renderComponent(component) { ReactDOM.render(component, container); } function render(location) { router.resolve(routes, location) .then(renderComponent) .catch(error => router.resolve(routes, { …
  • import React from ‘react’; import history from ‘.
  • The router itself can be written as a pair of two functions – matchURI(), an internal (private) function that helps to compare a parametrized path string with the actual URL; and resolve() function that traverses the list of routes, finds the route that matches to the given location, executes route handler function and returns result to the caller.

Read the full article, click here.


@koistya: “You might not need React Router #reactjs #routing #webdev”


If you happened to work with Facebook’s React.js library for a while, you might notice a few misconceptions floating in the React community…


You might not need React Router — Medium

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  • Redirecting to Meridian Recruiting.
  • Click if you are not redirected within 5 seconds…

Read the full article, click here.


@angularjobs: “Full Stack .NET Web Developer at Meridian Recruiting. 80-90K + 20% bonus (paid out consistent… Apply >”


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Role-based authorization using React-Router

  • Now we want to make the Profile route (and all its child routes) available only for users with the employee role, and the EmployeesManagement route available for users with the admin role.
  • By inheriting the Profile class from our new AuthorizedComponent we can easily prevent showing all its child routes if they are not available for the current user’s roles.
  • For example, if we have a route /admin/profile we may want to prevent users with only an employee role to open this route.
  • The second thing I had to deal with was the home page which has the same address (route) for all types of user roles.
  • This is a very simple container component which shows different children components depending on the current route (the RouteHandler component takes care of it – this is a subject for another blog post).

Read the full article, click here.


@burczu: “just blogged about #rolebased #authorization in #reactjs with #reactrouter: #javascript #frontend”


In the today’s post I will show you how to deal with the role-based authorization using React and React-router.


Role-based authorization using React-Router

Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting

Building the World Bank data site as a fast loading, single-page app:  #ReactJS

  • We can define our split points in the lazy load code.
  • Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting
  • We can create chunks in two steps: define split points in routes and use react router’s match in both client side and server side.
  • We can create on demand load chunks by define split point in our code.
  • React router allows us to use lazy load route-related code, also called dynamic routing.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Building the World Bank data site as a fast loading, single-page app: #ReactJS”


Code splitting is a slick way to reduce initial file requests and speed up your load time. We’re using it for building a massive single-page app for the World Bank.


Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting