How to Connect your React App to a REST API – codeburst

  • Today we are going to connect this app to an existing REST API and use the fetched data to display our previously created list of contacts.Over the whole series of articles, we’re going to build a functional contact list with React:Part 1 — How to Create a React App with create-react-appPart 2 — How…
  • This way, the app fetches contacts at the startup and fills our contact list with data.PreparationsIf you don’t have the source code of the previous part ready, you can clone it from GitHub, install the dependencies and start the appgit clone contacts-managergit checkout part-2npm installnpm startThe app is now available…
  • To begin, let’s install axios: In your root directory (where your package.json is) execute the following command line:npm i -S axiosNext, open your App.js and perform the following actions:add the componentDidMount lifecycle method to the App component.import axios from the just installed packageadd the axios GET request to componentDidMount to…
  • Since it is empty, it is the initial State object with a replaced “contacts” property.Finally — Set the new StateNow that we got our data, picked the relevant parts out of it and created a “new” State object, we store it in the State of the App call, puts the “newState” object as…
  • Also, you learned that if you want to fetch data from a server at the startup of the app, you’ll do it in componentDidMount in a suitable component.You also learned, how to set State and that you can pass an object or a function to setState.Last but not least, you’ve…

In the previous parts of this series you learned how to bootstrap a new React app with create-react-app and create a list component. Today we are going to connect this app to an existing REST API and…
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react-props-monitor now too with #react16 #reactjs #styledcomponents 😎

react-props-monitor now too with #react16 #reactjs #styledcomponents 😎

  • In-depth checking props in runtime for any React app.
  • PropsMonitor displays exactly which props caused the error based on PropTypes of component.
  • You can define any validation function for props, based on prevProps, nextProps and name of component.
  • ({ nextProps }) { ( . )
  • ; ; }; ({ prevProps, nextProps, name }) { ( name prevProps .

react-props-monitor – In-depth checking props in runtime for any React app.
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pixielabs/cavy – An integration test framework for #reactjs native

  • Cavy is a cross-platform integration test framework for React Native, by Pixie Labs.
  • Cavy (ab)uses React generating functions to give you the ability to refer to, and simulate actions upon, deeply nested components within your application.
  • This function should be used if your testable component does not respond to either or , for example:

    Cavy is a comparable tool to Appium.

  • The key difference is that Appium uses native hooks to access components (accessibility IDs), wheras Cavy uses React Native refs.
  • Jest is a useful tool for unit testing individual React Native components, whereas Cavy is an integration testing tool allowing you to run end-to-end user interface tests.

cavy – An integration test framework for React Native.
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Microservices with Docker, Flask, and React

  • In Part 4, we’ll add an end-to-end (e2e) testing solution, form validation to the React app, a Swagger service to document the API, and deal with some tech debt.
  • We’ll also set up a staging environment to test on before the app goes into production.
  • By the end of part 4, you should be able to…

    Check out the live app, running on EC2 –

    You can also test out the following endpoints…

In Part 4, we’ll add an end-to-end (e2e) testing solution, form validation to the React app, a Swagger service to document the API, and deal with some tech debt. We’ll also set up a staging environment to test on before the app goes into production.
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Thinking in React by radubrehar #javascript #reactjs via JavaScriptKicks

  • Yet the render method, the component props, and the component state are the most important things in a React app – getting a good grasp on these paves the way for productively using React in commercial apps.
  • In the above example, notice how state is updated with a new address object on every change – this avoids skipping updates when is used – which is just a React component that only re-renders when it receives new values for props and for state (it shallowly compares the old and new props objects and the old and new state objects).
  • Another powerful concept in React apps is controlled props – it basically means components don’t store any intermediate state for the controlled props (for example on updating the value inside a text input), but rather on every change, they notify the owner component of the change, so the owner can re-render the controlled component with updated values for the props.
  • The above inputs are example of controlled components (already baked into React), but basically this is the gist: uncontrolled components use their internal state to update their UI, while controlled components always show values from props.
  • And the beauty of it is that in almost no time you can become productive in building native UIs for mobile or desktop operating systems, or even for the webVR now that React is becoming widely adopted, with libraries written to target multiple platforms, but with one common way of thinking about UIs – declarative and component-based.

React is different in so many ways from its front-end predecessors. But the most different part is its way of thinking. Read on to find out more!
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