pixielabs/cavy – An integration test framework for #reactjs native

  • Cavy is a cross-platform integration test framework for React Native, by Pixie Labs.
  • Cavy (ab)uses React generating functions to give you the ability to refer to, and simulate actions upon, deeply nested components within your application.
  • This function should be used if your testable component does not respond to either or , for example:

    Cavy is a comparable tool to Appium.

  • The key difference is that Appium uses native hooks to access components (accessibility IDs), wheras Cavy uses React Native refs.
  • Jest is a useful tool for unit testing individual React Native components, whereas Cavy is an integration testing tool allowing you to run end-to-end user interface tests.

cavy – An integration test framework for React Native.
Continue reading “pixielabs/cavy – An integration test framework for #reactjs native”

Microservices with Docker, Flask, and React

  • In Part 4, we’ll add an end-to-end (e2e) testing solution, form validation to the React app, a Swagger service to document the API, and deal with some tech debt.
  • We’ll also set up a staging environment to test on before the app goes into production.
  • By the end of part 4, you should be able to…

    Check out the live app, running on EC2 –

    You can also test out the following endpoints…

In Part 4, we’ll add an end-to-end (e2e) testing solution, form validation to the React app, a Swagger service to document the API, and deal with some tech debt. We’ll also set up a staging environment to test on before the app goes into production.
Continue reading “Microservices with Docker, Flask, and React”

Thinking in React by radubrehar #javascript #reactjs via JavaScriptKicks

  • Yet the render method, the component props, and the component state are the most important things in a React app – getting a good grasp on these paves the way for productively using React in commercial apps.
  • In the above example, notice how state is updated with a new address object on every change – this avoids skipping updates when is used – which is just a React component that only re-renders when it receives new values for props and for state (it shallowly compares the old and new props objects and the old and new state objects).
  • Another powerful concept in React apps is controlled props – it basically means components don’t store any intermediate state for the controlled props (for example on updating the value inside a text input), but rather on every change, they notify the owner component of the change, so the owner can re-render the controlled component with updated values for the props.
  • The above inputs are example of controlled components (already baked into React), but basically this is the gist: uncontrolled components use their internal state to update their UI, while controlled components always show values from props.
  • And the beauty of it is that in almost no time you can become productive in building native UIs for mobile or desktop operating systems, or even for the webVR now that React is becoming widely adopted, with libraries written to target multiple platforms, but with one common way of thinking about UIs – declarative and component-based.

React is different in so many ways from its front-end predecessors. But the most different part is its way of thinking. Read on to find out more!
Continue reading “Thinking in React by radubrehar #javascript #reactjs via JavaScriptKicks”

.@reactjs Express: Learn #ReactJS with Interactive Examples: #JavaScript

.@reactjs Express: Learn #ReactJS with Interactive Examples:  #JavaScript

  • React is a framework for building performant interfaces for the web and other platforms.
  • You should use this guide as a companion to the official Facebook documentation for getting started .
  • I hope you enjoy learning React.
  • When you write your first React app, you might start with something like this.
  • While these things aren’t required to write React, most React developers use them because they tend to be easier to use and more maintainable.

Learn React with interactive examples.
Continue reading “.@reactjs Express: Learn #ReactJS with Interactive Examples: #JavaScript”

Build ReactJS App with Visual Studio Code

Build #ReactJS #App with #VisualStudio Code by @thinkaboutnitin cc @CsharpCorner  #VS2017

  • In this artilce, I will introdice Visual Studio Code and how to get it ready to setup to build React apps.
  • The first step is to open React app in Visual Studio Code.
  • Once your React app is open in Visual Studio Code, you will find some directories in left corner.
  • By default, when we run ReactJS app, we get the above web page in our browser.
  • So, go ahead and build your React app with the help of Visual Studio Code.

Explore ReactJS App with Visual Studio Code.
Continue reading “Build ReactJS App with Visual Studio Code”

Building an app with @reactjs? Accept payments with our new React components that help you quickly add @stripe! ⚛️🚀✨

  • React components that help you quickly add Stripe Elements to your React app.
  • Then, load Stripe.js in your application:

    In order for your application to have access to the Stripe object, let’s add to our root React App component:

    Next, when you’re building components for your checkout form, you’ll want to wrap the component around your .

  • All applications using must use the component, which sets up the Stripe context for a component tree.
  • uses the provider pattern (which is also adopted by tools like and ) to scope a Stripe context to a tree of components.
  • Components that need to initiate Source or Token creations (e.g. a checkout form component) can access via props of any component returned by the HOC factory.

react-stripe-elements – React components for Stripe.js and Stripe Elements
Continue reading “Building an app with @reactjs? Accept payments with our new React components that help you quickly add @stripe! ⚛️🚀✨”