React Router v4 – David Kerr – Medium

“React Router v4” by @dkerrious  #reactjs #React #javascript #coding

  • npm install react-router react-router-dom — savePopular patterns for prior versions of React Router have a routes.js file to centrally managing the routing depending on the path, but in my opinion, this is no longer necessary.
  • In my root React component, which I am calling App.js, I can select which specific components to display depending on the path.import React, { Component } from ‘react’;import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from ‘react-router-dom’;import Header from “.
  • /components/Footer”;class App extends Component { constructor() { super(); this.state = { stuff: stuff; }; }render() { let { stuff } = this.state; return ( Router //wrapper for your router, given alias from BrowserRouter div className=”App” Header / //this component will always be visible because it is outside of a specific…
  • To do this, you need to use the alternative syntax to link a component to a given route.Route path=”/dashboard” component={()=Dashboard stuff={stuff} /}/As someone who prefers to manage state as close as possible to the root React component, I prefer the second approach.
  • Depending on your specific use case, you might find one more practical than the another.The final basic react-router feature I will point out is the Link method.import { Link } from ‘react-router-dom’;…Link to=”/home”Home/LinkThis replaces a href=””/a whenever you want to navigate within your application.React Router is as complex or as…

As with any new technology, resources and documentation online lack for using the new version of React Router. The goal of this article is to show and explain a basic implementation of React Router…
Continue reading “React Router v4 – David Kerr – Medium”

7 Reasons Why React Native Is the Right Choice for Mobile App Development

7 Reasons Why #reactnative Is the Right Choice for Mobile App Development  #reactjs

  • 7 Reasons Why React Native Is the Right Choice for Mobile App DevelopmentJavaScript libraries are the boon companions of developers.
  • This new technology uses JavaScript and XML-esque markup, known as JSX to develop mobile application interface.Currently, React Native development offers support for Android and iOS platforms, which indeed covers over 95% of the mobile app world.
  • For example: When developing native iOS app, you cannot send a SMS directly by using the platform API, until the native platform SMS application is launched to the user.
  • Native Code is Welcome, AnytimeWhen building an app with React Native, it is easy and possible to combine with the components that are written in Java, Swift, Objective-C, .NET, or any other programming language.
  • So, for example: If you are familiar with developer tools for Chrome or Safari, the same can be utilized for mobile development.The option to integrate third party plugin means there is less reliance up on the web-view for some crucial functionalities to be embedded to the app.The API functionality can…

JavaScript libraries are the boon companions of developers. From server-side programs to web page control, they have done an accomplished job for the web world. And to add magic to it, Jordan Walke…
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3 Best React JS Online Courses – Elvis Miranda – Medium

3 Best React JS Online Courses

☞  

#reactjs

  • I answer every single question that students post in a timely manner.I can’t wait to see you inside!Who is the target audience?Anyone looking to launch their own React applications, switch careers, or freelance as a React developerGo To CourseTOP 2: The Complete React Native and Redux CourseiOS and Android App Development from scratch — build fully native mobile apps ridiculously fast!DescriptionIf you’re tired of spinning your wheels learning Swift or Android, this is the course for you.Authentication?
  • Of course!This course will get you up and running with React Native quickly, and teach you the core knowledge you need to deeply understand and build React components for mobile devices.Both OSX and Windows supported — develop iOS or Android!We’ll start by mastering the fundamentals of React, including JSX, “props”, “state”, and event handling.
  • To learn React you have to understand it.Learn how to use React’s custom markup language, JSX, to clean up your Javascript code.Learn the process of converting JSX to raw Javascript on the fly in your browser.Master the process of breaking down a complex component into many smaller, interchangeable components.Grasp the difference between “props” and “state” and when to use each.Develop apps that are unique, fun, and responsive.Build on both Android and iOS platformsMaster integration with Firebase for user authenticationLearn the core principles of navigation with React NativeI’ve built the course that I would have wanted to take when I was learning React Native.
  • A course that explains the concepts and how they’re implemented in the best order for you to learn and deeply understand them.Who is the target audience?This course is for anyone looking to make native appsGo To CourseThe comprehensive guide to building professional web apps with Facebook’s React FluxReact Flux Course DescriptionWelcome to React and Flux Web Development for Beginners.This course is designed for developers who know basic HTML and CSS but who want to take their skills to the next level by building data-driven web apps — the kind of apps that can be used for products or startups and the type of apps that can interact with servers.The course is also for developers of any level who want to know and master React and Flux.Why React?Why should you learn React js instead of Angular or Backbone or Ember or Meteor?
  • Here are some of the topics we cover:React Components and component nestingReact Component user interaction with statesReact Component data management with propsRobust architectures with Flux and RefluxBuilding simple Node Express serversMaking HTTP requests and managing data in ReactIn-line React styling with JavascriptParsing and managing JSON in ReactSingle page applications with React RouterJavascript overviewProfessional development practices and tipsGo To Course

React is on open-source JavaScript framework for building web & mobile user interfaces. React is maintained by Facebook and a vivid developer community and is being used for major websites like…
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Mocking API responses with React Apollo – Carlos Martinez – Medium

  • Mocking API responses with React ApolloApollo Client and the GraphQL tools that have been made open source within the last years are pretty awesome, the community that is being builded around them is great.
  • However, as with every new technology, there are a lot of things that need to mature and improve.Documentation on testing is definitely one of the bits that needs a lot of improvements, it isn’t clear what to do, and I personally found myself digging into the source code to understand what to do.One of the problems I faced was that I wanted to use mock responses when testing my app components, and there are at least two ways of doing this:The first way is to use graphql-tools.
  • From their docs:This package allows you to use the GraphQL schema language to build your GraphQL.js schema, and also includes useful schema tools like per-type mocking.You can use this library together with a custom MockNetworkInterface to return mocked responses to your components:const { mockServer } = require(“graphql-tools”);const { print } = MockNetworkInterface { constructor(schema, mocks = {}) { if (!
  • schema) { throw new Error(‘Cannot create Mock Api without specifying a schema’); } this.mockServer = mockServer(schema, mocks); } query(request) { return request.variables); }}This is nice, and very flexible, with graphql-tools you can do pretty much whatever you do in your actual API.What I didn’t like about this approach is that you need your schema in sync with the schema defined in your API (you can do this making an instrospection query to your backend), I also found this approach overcomplicates things unnecessarily.The second (and simpler) approach I found was to use the mockNetworkInterface class, this class is defined in react-apollo/test-utils, you can have a peek on it here.To use it, you first need to define some Mock Requests (these requests need to be exactly the same your components will make):const GraphQLMocks = [ { request: { query: UserProfileQuery, variables: {} }, result: { data: { current_user: { id: 1, first_name: ‘Foo’, last_name: ‘Bar’, email: ‘foo@example.com’ } } } }];The UserProfileQuery is exported from your component:export const UserProfileQuery = gql` query userProfile { current_user { id first_name last_name email } }`;And this is how you use it to setup your tests:import { mockNetworkInterface } from ApolloClient from ‘apollo-client’;import { ApolloProvider } from ‘react-apollo’;import { mount } from ‘enzyme’;import App from ‘.
  • /App.js’;import React from ‘react’;const setupTests = () = { const networkInterface = // or mocks); const client = new ApolloClient({ networkInterface, addTypename: false }); const wrapper = mount( ApolloProvider client={client} App / /ApolloProvider ); return { wrapper };};It is important that you pass addTypename: false to ApolloClient, otherwise you would have to include a __typename field in all your mocks and queries.Now any queries your components make will be handled by your mocked responses, you have full control of what you want to return.And that’s it!

Apollo Client and the GraphQL tools that have been made open source within the last years are pretty awesome, the community that is being builded around them is great. However, as with every new…
Continue reading “Mocking API responses with React Apollo – Carlos Martinez – Medium”

React Router v4 – David Kerr – Medium

React Router v4  #javascript #react #reactrouter #reactjs

  • npm install react-router react-router-dom — savePopular patterns for prior versions of React Router have a routes.js file to centrally managing the routing depending on the path, but in my opinion, this is no longer necessary.
  • In my root React component, which I am calling App.js, I can select which specific components to display depending on the path.import React, { Component } from ‘react’;import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from ‘react-router-dom’;import Header from “.
  • /components/Footer”;class App extends Component { constructor() { super(); this.state = { stuff: stuff; }; }render() { let { stuff } = this.state; return ( Router //wrapper for your router, given alias from BrowserRouter div className=”App” Header / //this component will always be visible because it is outside of a specific Route Route exact path=”/” component={Home}/ //at the root path, show this component Route path=”/dashboard” component={()=Dashboard stuff={stuff} /}/ //at the path ‘/dashboard’, show this other component Footer / //this is also permanently mounted /div /Router ); }}export default App;There are two ways to link components to routes.
  • To do this, you need to use the alternative syntax to link a component to a given route.Route path=”/dashboard” component={()=Dashboard stuff={stuff} /}/As someone who prefers to manage state as close as possible to the root React component, I prefer the second approach.
  • Depending on your specific use case, you might find one more practical than the another.The final basic react-router feature I will point out is the Link method.import { Link } from ‘react-router-dom’;…Link to=”/home”Home/LinkThis replaces a href=””/a whenever you want to navigate within your application.React Router is as complex or as simple as you want to make it.

As with any new technology, resources and documentation online lack for using the new version of React Router. The goal of this article is to show and explain a basic implementation of React Router…
Continue reading “React Router v4 – David Kerr – Medium”

Rewriting Transmission UI with React – Hacker Noon

Rewriting Transmission UI with #reactjs – Hacker Noon

  • This forces you to always work with the same mentality not allowing you to test new approaches to solve problems.Following our desire to learn new stuff to make our life easier, we wanted to experiment with new technology to build a side project with a complete new stack that fits better with the app requirements.In that same week, a friend of mine was talking about a bug that was affecting him in the web client of Transmission.
  • We decided to start building a new interface from scratch to understand new patterns, new approaches and discover what would be the next challenges for the ultimate interface.Our experimental stackReviewing all of the features in the current Transmission web client, the stack we chose was React for the user interface, Mobx for the state management and CSS modules for all the stuff related with the application styles, with a new build process managed by Webpack.On the other hand, and with the above stack in mind, we decided to use some best practices for the long term quality of this project.
  • New tools have appeared during the last 5 years to improve our life like SASS, LESS or CSS Modules.If you are used to code big sets of components you can make the common mistake of reuse style classes for different components.
  • This is important because most of the components contain several paths and we need to ensure that each one is covered.Integrating this new set of tests to some CI we can be more confident about future changes that we apply to the application.As we can see in this example we are rendering the Progress bar component with mocked torrent data.Then with the snapshot technique we can ensure that the rendered result is what we expect comparing with previous snapshot.
  • So we decided to follow the current design, we just wanted to propose a new code architecture.We didn’t want to impact the end users in case that this code were considered for inclusion in the main Transmission repository.Lastly, even if the project dies out, for whatever reason, we’re happy anyway, because we learnt a lot of things and had a really fun time during its development.

I remember it was about two months ago when I was talking with Eduardo Lanchares about the best stack for the next webapp. Sometimes you are at work and you are stuck with the current set-up of…
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You Might Not Need React – Hacker Noon

You Might Not Need React  #Reactjs #JavaScript

  • You have the limited developers team with their skills and limited time for work.
  • People around want us to use the newest technologies available to us, right after they have been created.
  • We leave off working on our projects not written with React / ES6 / Webpack (or name another new technology) just because it’s not cool that they were written not with it.
  • New technology is not always a good thing.
  • I don’t mean that we don’t have to move on and bring new technologies into the development of our products.

“If you are a front-end developer and you still don’t use React in your projects, you might be a bad front-end developer. You don’t use ES6 either, do you? Too bad for you then. Maybe Webpack? No…
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How to avoid refactoring in your first React.js application

How to avoid refactoring in your first #ReactJS app:

  • In the short blog post I will try to point out some pitfalls, which you should take care of if you want to avoid refactoring in your first React.js application.
  • A common pattern is to create several stateless components that just render data, and have a stateful component above them in the hierarchy that passes its state to its children via props.
  • I don’t see any reasons why not using ES6.
  • If we want to change the data of our big grid component, we have to re-initialize our grid as a jQuery object in React using the componentDidUpdate method.
  • Let’s imagine we need a big grid component, which does some complex things with cells.

Popularity of React.js is growing pretty fast and it seems like React became a compact and beautiful way of how to develop your applications. I have worked on a side project and felt like it is right time to try React. During development of my first project in React I had to do several refactorings. In this short blog post I will try to point out some pitfalls, which you should take care of if you want to avoid refactoring in your first React.js application.
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Phoenix ReactJS (Tempe, AZ)

Mark your calendar Phoenix! The Phoenix ReactJS is @GoDaddy August 10 - details:

  • Start a Meetup Group Start a Meetup Group
  • Generic Pre-requisite: React is a new technology.
  • I recommend that you have previously built something real in React, whether professional or your own pet…
  • By creating a Meetup account, you agree to the Terms of Service
  • Join us and be the first to know when new Meetups are scheduled

Read the full article, click here.


@williamu: “Mark your calendar Phoenix! The Phoenix ReactJS is @GoDaddy August 10 – details:”


This is the Phoenix community of javascript developers coding with ReactJS.


Phoenix ReactJS (Tempe, AZ)

Why React.JS is Preferable for Web Application Development? –

Why #ReactJS is Preferable for Web #ApplicationDevelopment?

  • More flexible and efficient aspect has appeared in web application development.
  • Front end development is a crucial part of web app development.
  • As it helped a lot to least DOM tree and renders when changed.
  • Each component instance has to maintain reference to its DOM nodes.
  • Java script is pretty much good in front end development when dynamic web pages take place.

Read the full article, click here.


@Brainvire: “Why #ReactJS is Preferable for Web #ApplicationDevelopment?”


React.JS is an Open-source JavaScript library maintained by world’s top most community such as Facebook and Instagram. React.JS development has one way data


Why React.JS is Preferable for Web Application Development? –