React Components Explained – codeburst

  • Something like thisimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { render () { return div This is a component /div }}class MyOtherComponent extends React.Component { render () { return ( div MyComponent / /div ) }}This way you are able to compose more complex and useful user interface for your…
  • Component’s render method return JSX which then use to create real HTML output which will be rendered in the browser.The interesting Thing about render method is that it runs every time when your component State or Props updates.
  • Let me show you a exampleimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; } render () { return div My name is {this.state.name} /div }}// if we render this component the output will beMy name is ManojIgnore the super(props) (out of…
  • Let’s see an example.class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; this.changeName = this.changeName.bind(this); } changeName () { this.setState({ name: “Your Name” }); } render () { return div onClick={this.changeName} My name is {this.state.name} /div }}In the above code we are telling our React…
  • You can run this code on jsFiddle here.PropsVisualise props as options that can be passed to a component to customize its functionality.For example, I have a heading component which renders a heading with subtitle.class MyHeading extends React.Component { render () { return div h1This is a heading/h1 pSubtitle/p /div }}If…

The simplest library I ever used in my life is React. As you know React is based upon component design. Everything in React is a component which makes it easy to reuse components frequently. You can…
Continue reading “React Components Explained – codeburst”

React Components Explained – Manoj Singh Negi – Medium

“React Components Explained” by @manojnegiwd  #reactjs #NodeJS #javascript #coding

  • Something like thisimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { render () { return div This is a component /div }}class MyOtherComponent extends React.Component { render () { return ( div MyComponent / /div ) }}This way you are able to compose more complex and useful user interface for your users.
  • Component’s render method return JSX which then use to create real HTML output which will be rendered in the browser.The interesting Thing about render method is that it runs every time when your component State or Props updates.
  • Let me show you a exampleimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; } render () { return div My name is {this.state.name} /div }}// if we render this component the output will beMy name is ManojIgnore the super(props) (out of the scope of this article) focus on this.state this is where our component state lives.
  • Let’s see an example.class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; this.changeName = this.changeName.bind(this); } changeName () { this.setState({ name: “Your Name” }); } render () { return div onClick={this.changeName} My name is {this.state.name} /div }}In the above code we are telling our React component to call this.changeName whenever user clicks on the div.
  • You can run this code on jsFiddle here.PropsVisualise props as options that can be passed to a component to customize its functionality.For example, I have a heading component which renders a heading with subtitle.class MyHeading extends React.Component { render () { return div h1This is a heading/h1 pSubtitle/p /div }}If I will use this component it will always render same HTML, someting like this.This is a headingsubtitleIf we use our component in this way it is not of much use right ?

The simplest library I ever used in my life is React. As you know React hit is based upon component design. Everything in React is a component which makes it easy to reuse components frequently. You…
Continue reading “React Components Explained – Manoj Singh Negi – Medium”

React Components Explained – Manoj Singh Negi – Medium

Don't understand #ReactJS components? Get to know them with this cool guide:  #JavaScript

  • Something like thisimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { render () { return div This is a component /div }}class MyOtherComponent extends React.Component { render () { return ( div MyComponent / /div ) }}This way you are able to compose more complex and useful user interface for your users.
  • Component’s render method return JSX which then use to create real HTML output which will be rendered in the browser.The interesting Thing about render method is that it runs every time when your component State or Props updates.
  • Let me show you a exampleimport React from ‘react’;class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; } render () { return div My name is {this.state.name} /div }}// if we render this component the output will beMy name is ManojIgnore the super(props) (out of the scope of this article) focus on this.state this is where our component state lives.
  • Let’s see an example.class MyComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { name: “Manoj” }; this.changeName = this.changeName.bind(this); } changeName () { this.setState({ name: “Your Name” }); } render () { return div onClick={this.changeName} My name is {this.state.name} /div }}In the above code we are telling our React component to call this.changeName whenever user clicks on the div.
  • You can run this code on jsFiddle here.PropsVisualise props as options that can be passed to a component to customize its functionality.For example, I have a heading component which renders a heading with subtitle.class MyHeading extends React.Component { render () { return div h1This is a heading/h1 pSubtitle/p /div }}If I will use this component it will always render same HTML, someting like this.This is a headingsubtitleIf we use our component in this way it is not of much use right ?

The simplest library I ever used in my life is React. As you know React is based upon component design. Everything in React is a component which makes it easy to reuse components frequently. You can…
Continue reading “React Components Explained – Manoj Singh Negi – Medium”

Playing with React Native Animations – Hacker Noon

Play with React Native animations:  #ReactJS #JavaScript

  • For the delay we’re using the delay that was passed to the component.
  • We want to actually use these files in our app – to do so replace index.ios.js and index.android.js with the following.
  • We’ll keep this very simple and create 10 data elements with a width between 0 and the screen width – this will all take place in app/index.js
  • In app/AnimatedBar.js we’ll just set some static styles and apply them to our view.
  • Then create an app/index.js and app/AnimatedBar.js and copy and paste the following into them to get started.

For my first post of the year I wanted to keep it light and experiment a little bit with the React Native Animated API. We’ll create a few bars that animate in and constantly change their size. Here…
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What the heck is a ‘thunk’?

What the heck is a 'thunk'? 
#reactjs #js #coding #redux #thunk #programming @daveceddia

  • It would be nice if an action creator could return that function instead of an action object.
  • Same action, but now you can “create” it by calling the userLoggedIn function.
  • then ( function () { // pretend we declared an action creator // called ‘userLoggedOut’, and now we can dispatch it dispatch ( userLoggedOut ()); }); } }
  • It’s a special (and uncommon) name for a function that’s returned by another.
  • Actions are just objects – and they are expected to only be objects.

But seriously: Redux Thunk is a really confusing thing when you first hear about it. I think it’s mostly because of that word “thunk.” So let’s clear that up first.
Continue reading “What the heck is a ‘thunk’?”

Why Redux is not so easy, some alternatives

  • The global state tree is cumbersome to maintain.
  • Since the state tree needs to be immutable, lists also need to be.
  • When there is a user, we can load the lists.
  • Dispatch, also, by idiom/default, does not get access to the state tree.
  • A reducer is responsible for just one branch of the state tree.

Why Redux is not so easy, some alternatives | r/reactjs at reddit.com
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Why Angular2 is Easier Than AngularJS

Why Angular2 is Easier Than AngularJS #ReactJS
☞

  • The event binding works for any DOM event, without any code required.
  • Simplifies a great deal of things to make it easier to develop in AngularJS
  • HTML that conveys what is doing – Event & Data binding
  • In the write-up, we will go over some of the major reasons why Angular 2 is actually simpler to get started than AngularJS
  • It can also be a better place to start for developers new to AngularJS, where rather than spending time learning a complex beast (and what a beautiful beast it is!

Read the full article, click here.


@react_planet: “Why Angular2 is Easier Than AngularJS #ReactJS
☞”


You must know that Angular2 is coming (or is already here, depending on who you speak to!). That said, a lot of people have been up in arms at the drastic changes that Angular2 is proposing over AngularJS


Why Angular2 is Easier Than AngularJS

Why does React emphasize on unidirectional data flow and Flux architecture?

Why does #ReactJS emphasize on unidirectional data flow and #Flux architecture?

  • The view is a function of the application state.
  • View components subscribe to the stores and automatically re-render themselves using the new data.
  • As the state can be mutated by both controller and view, sometimes the data flow becomes unpredictable.
  • In two way data binding the view is updated when the state changes, and vice versa.
  • By keeping the data flow unidirectional you keep a single source of truth i.e. Store.

Read the full article, click here.


@Hashnoder: “Why does #ReactJS emphasize on unidirectional data flow and #Flux architecture?”


The official docs say that it gives you the control over how data flows throughout your app. I didn’t get this. How is this principle violated if I decide . Tagged with ReactJS,JavaScript,Flux.


Why does React emphasize on unidirectional data flow and Flux architecture?

React Native Tutorial: Create Dynamic Animated Lists

  • The answer is, because we only need _deleteItem() to simulate the removal process of an item by firing out the height animation on the actual list row component.
  • When the component is mounted, componentDidMount is fired as well as the animation using the Animated React Native component.
  • class DynamicListRow extends Component { // these values will need to be fixed either within the component or sent through props _defaultHeightValue = 60; _defaultTransition = 500; state = { _rowHeight : new Animated.
  • */ render() { return ( ); } /* For rendering the list rows we will use DynamicListRow component.
  • export default class DynamicList extends Component { /* Default state values */ state = { loading : true, dataSource : new ListView.

Read the full article, click here.


@ModusCreate: “”Would you like to add some visual sugar to your dynamic lists in #ReactNative?” #javascript”


Alex Lazar’s step-by-step guide to help you build your own dynamic animated ListView in React Native.


React Native Tutorial: Create Dynamic Animated Lists

Animating SVG Charts built with React and D3 by not important on CodePen

  • As the axes and line plot components receive new data, they also receive new scales based on this data.
  • Component { render () { const xScale = this.buildScale(/* …
  • Another critical ingredient in creating charts are the scales , which will handle fitting the line plot to the dimensions of the container.
  • {x1, x2}} className=”line-chart__axis-tick line-chart__axis-tick–vertical” y1={0} y2={0} /> {labelFn(tickValue)} ); }); } render () { const {scale, view, trbl, labelFn, tickValues, orientation} = this.props; let x1 = view[0]; if (orientation === VerticalAxis.orientation.RIGHT) { x1 = 0; } const x2 = x1; const transform = `translate(${trbl[3]}, ${trbl[0]})`; return (
  • Once the wrapped components are in place, the chart gains the new behavior of smoothly animating the line plot and axes to accommodate the new data.

Read the full article, click here.


@56clindsey: “wrote a blog post about my method of #svg #charts #animation using #reactjs & #d3js via @CodePen #DataVisualization”


One possible approach to creating data visualization charts is to use React and D3, where React handles building all of the SVG and D3 does the calculations required. D3 has the capacity to create SVG elements and manipulate the DOM directly but it’s also a toolbox with just about everything needed to build charts in any way imaginable. For this blog post’s experiments, SVG and React were used but could have also been done using the Canvas element and Pixi.js, for example, thanks to D3’s flexibility.


Animating SVG Charts built with React and D3 by not important on CodePen