ASP.NET MVC 5 With ReactJS

#ASPNET #MVC 5 With #ReactJS by @viralJain007 cc @CsharpCorner

  • There are many popular JavaScript libraries in the market but React is the the most popular, and it has strong and large foundation and community behind it.
  • When we develop applications in MVC, we use JavaScript, jQuery, and HTML with it.
  • Now, NuGet package team has provided in-built library package for Visual Studio for MVC 4, 5 and ASP.NET Core.
  • So now, you can directly download the NuGet Package for React.js for your MVC application from npm, and use it in your application easily.
  • In this article, we learned how to use React JS in ASP NET MVC.

React is a very popular front-end library developed by Facebook. It’s basically used for handling view layer for web and mobile apps.
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Hacker News readers as Progressive Web Apps

  • A spiritual successor to TodoMVC

    TodoMVC has helped thousands of developers select
    an MV* framework for their JavaScript applications.

  • However, the web ecosystem
    has evolved in the past few years allowing us to build powerful applications using
    modern browser capabilities.
  • To provide developers with examples, we collected a list of unofficial Hacker News clients built with a number of popular JavaScript frameworks and libraries.
  • Each implementation is a complete Progressive Web App that utilizes
    different progressive technologies to provide a fast, reliable and engaging experience.
  • Our implementations aim to follow a loose specification.

Hacker News readers as Progressive Web Apps
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Topcoder Getting Started with ReactJS

Getting Started with ReactJS - A blog that is supplemented by a Fun Challenge!

  • ReactJS uses JSX to transpire the HTML element on the web page.
  • React first converts JSX into a JavaScript file that is rendered by the browser, resulting in HTML code.
  • BABEL converts JSX code in JavaScript and takes care of cross-browser compatibility.
  • ReactJS functions are called components.
  • ReactJS gives us power to pass data between components and we do it using props and states.

Have you ever thought of passing your HTML code into JavaScript code? How about displaying HTML elements via JavaScript?
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Make React Fast Again [Part 1]: Performance Timeline

Make React Fast Again: Performance Timeline ►►►  #ReactJS #ReactNative

  • Performance timelineReact 15.4.0 introduced a new performance timeline feature that lets you see exactly when components get mounted, updated, and unmounted.
  • While it is typical to have fairly deep component trees in React, if you are optimizing a component that is mounted frequently, it can help to reduce the number of wrapper components since each adds a small performance and memory penalty.One caveat here is that the timing numbers in the timeline are for the development build of React, which is much slower than prod.
  • Also, whether or not a component updates at all is not dependent on a prod build.Demo!For fun, I rigged the TodoMVC app to have some serious performance problems.
  • See if you can spot which components are causing the performance problems :)Debugging Performance Issues in ProductionThe performance timeline feature in React only works in local development, since it gets compiled out of React’s production build.
  • It lets you quickly see which components are updating, and which might be slowing down your app.Since react_perf only works in development, check out LogRocket, for diagnosing bugs and performance issues in production.

React is usually pretty fast, but it’s easy to make small mistakes that lead to performance issues. Slow component mounts, deep component trees, and unnecessary render cycles can quickly add up to an…
Continue reading “Make React Fast Again [Part 1]: Performance Timeline”

Make React Fast Again [Part 2]: why-did-you-update – Hacker Noon

Make React Fast Again: why-did-you-update

by @b_edelstein 



#ReactJS #JavaScript

  • By default, React components will re-render whenever their parent renders, even if their props didn’t change.For example, if I have a simple component like this:class DumbComponent extends Component { render() { return div {this.props.value} /div; }}With a parent component like this:class Parent extends Component { render() { return div DumbComponent value={3} / /div; }}Whenever the parent component renders, DumbComponent will re-render, despite its props not changing.Generally, if render runs, and there were no changes to the virtual DOM, it is a wasted render cycle since the render method should be pure and not have any side effects.
  • == ‘production’) { const {whyDidYouUpdate} = require(‘why-did-you-update’) whyDidYouUpdate(React)}Note that this tool is great in local development but make sure it’s disabled in production since it will slow down your app.Understanding the outputwhy-did-you-update monitors your app as it runs and logs components that may have changed unnecessarily.
  • It lets you see the props before and after a render cycle it determined may have been unnecessary.Fixing unnecessary rendersOnce you’ve identified components in your app that are re-rendering unnecessarily, there are a few easy fixes.Use PureComponentIn the above example, DumbComponent is a pure function of its props.
  • If shouldComponentUpdate returns true, render will be called, if it returns false, nothing happens.By implementing this method, you can instruct React to avoid re-rendering a given component if its props don’t change.For example, we could implement shouldComponentUpdate in our dumb component from above like this:class DumbComponent extends Component { { if (this.props.value !
  • It also records the HTML and CSS on the page, recreating pixel-perfect videos of even the most complex single-page is a handy tool for detecting potentially unnecessary component re-renders, helping you make your app perform better.Since why-did-you-update only works in development, check out LogRocket, for diagnosing bugs and performance issues in production.For more React performance tips, check out parts 1 and 3 of this series:

React is usually pretty fast, but it’s easy to make small mistakes that lead to performance issues. Slow component mounts, deep component trees, and unnecessary render cycles can quickly add up to an…
Continue reading “Make React Fast Again [Part 2]: why-did-you-update – Hacker Noon”

JSK Weekly is out. Come and see the best stories of the past week #javascript #reactjs

JSK Weekly is out. Come and see the best stories of the past week  #javascript #reactjs

  • JavaScript modules are with us.
  • Browsers implement them natively, and now Node.js decided to introduce them using *.
  • Johannes Ewald writes about the current state of JavaScript modules, including browser implementations, Webpack, Node.js changes, what does it means for library creators, users, etc.
  • If you are still struggling with parallelism and concurrency, take a look at Jonathan Martin’s article on elegant concurrency patterns in JavaScript.
  • Also big news last week was the release of Node.js 8 which includes npm version 5, a new version of V8 engine with significant performance optimizations, native add-ons support, buffer changes, and much more.

JavaScript modules are with us. Browsers implement them natively, and now Node.js decided to introduce them using *.mjs extension which caused quite a stir in the community. Johannes Ewald writes about the current state of JavaScript modules, including browser implementations, Webpack, Node.js changes, what does it means for library creators, users, etc.

Jake Archibald has a great article on HTTP/2 push specification where he takes a deeper look into it and the problems with the various browser implementations.

If you are still struggling with parallelism and concurrency, take a look at Jonathan Martin’s article on elegant concurrency patterns in JavaScript. He covers event loop, promise chaining, async functions, parallel execution and other topics.

Also big news last week was the release of Node.js 8 which includes npm version 5, a new version of V8 engine with significant performance optimizations, native add-ons support, buffer changes, and much more. We have several articles covering the new features.

Continue reading “JSK Weekly is out. Come and see the best stories of the past week #javascript #reactjs”

Make React Fast Again [Part 1]: Performance Timeline

Make React Fast Again [Part 1]: Performance Timeline @b_edelstein  #Javascript #Reactjs

  • Performance timelineReact 15.4.0 introduced a new performance timeline feature that lets you see exactly when components get mounted, updated, and unmounted.
  • While it is typical to have fairly deep component trees in React, if you are optimizing a component that is mounted frequently, it can help to reduce the number of wrapper components since each adds a small performance and memory penalty.One caveat here is that the timing numbers in the timeline are for the development build of React, which is much slower than prod.
  • Also, whether or not a component updates at all is not dependent on a prod build.Demo!For fun, I rigged the TodoMVC app to have some serious performance problems.
  • See if you can spot which components are causing the performance problems :)Debugging Performance Issues in ProductionThe performance timeline feature in React only works in local development, since it gets compiled out of React’s production build.
  • It lets you quickly see which components are updating, and which might be slowing down your app.Since react_perf only works in development, check out LogRocket, for diagnosing bugs and performance issues in production.

React is usually pretty fast, but it’s easy to make small mistakes that lead to performance issues. Slow component mounts, deep component trees, and unnecessary render cycles can quickly add up to an…
Continue reading “Make React Fast Again [Part 1]: Performance Timeline”