JavaScript ES 2017: Learn Async/Await by Example – codeburst

  • Consider the below code:function doubleAfter2Seconds(x) { return new Promise(resolve = { setTimeout(() = { resolve(x * 2); }, 2000); });}In this code we have a function called doubleAfter2Seconds.
  • Here’s what the boilerplate code looks like:function addPromise(x){ return new Promise(resolve = { // Code goes here… // resolve() });}Awesome.
  • In this example we should be returning x + 2*a + 2*b + 2*c. Here’s the code:function addPromise(x){ return new Promise(resolve = { = { = { = { resolve(x + a + b + c); }) }) }) });}Lets walk through the code again, line by line.First, we create…
  • Here’s what that looks like:async function addAsync(x) { // code here…}Now that you’ve created an async function, we can make use of the await keyword which will pause our code until the Promise has resolved.
  • Here’s how easy that is:async function addAsync(x) { const a = await doubleAfter2Seconds(10); const b = await doubleAfter2Seconds(20); const c = await doubleAfter2Seconds(30); return x + a + b + c;}And here’s the full code:As you can see, we’re still making use of the same doubleAfter2Seconds function.

ES 2017 introduced Asynchronous functions. Async functions are essentially a cleaner way to work with asynchronous code in JavaScript. In order to understand exactly what these are, and how they work…
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