Mobdux: Combining the good parts of MobX and Redux – Cameron Fletcher – Medium

Mobdux: combining the good parts of MobX and Redux  #ReactJS #Redux #Mob

  • In MobX it is easy to structure your stores in a tree-like manner so that at any point you can view the entire state of your application.
  • Additionally, by using MobX in strict mode, you are forced to make any mutations to your state in actions.
  • The combination of a single store, strict mode, and the excellent mobx-react-devtools help give back some of the predictability and traceability of Redux.One of the ways the libraries significantly diverge however, is when connecting your state to your components.
  • Redux on the other hand, recommends the smart component / dumb component pairing so that each component (regardless of where it sits in the hierarchy) can look up everything it needs to render itself.I prefer the Redux approach for a number of reasons:Easier to move things around in your component…
  • Also, we can remove all knowledge of MobX from our dumb components by encapsulating all of this logic in our smart component wrapper, removing the need for the observer decorator entirely.

MobX and Redux give you two opposing ways to manage your state effectively in a React application. As an experiment I attempted to merge the good parts of both approaches, and ended up with a new…
Continue reading “Mobdux: Combining the good parts of MobX and Redux – Cameron Fletcher – Medium”

Typescript or Flow – Product at Home

#Typescript or #Flow: What’s your type?  #ReactJS

  • If you spend your days making 100-line apps or scripting stuff in a console, maybe adding types is not the thing for you.But if you’re working on bigger apps or libraries, spending a couple of hours to set up and learn the basics of TS or Flow will bring you…
  • You end up with a more robust and reliable code base.What really matters for you as a developer is the final outputI see a lot of guides, sometimes really good ones, focussed on the structural and implementation differences between TS and Flow — TS is a language, Flow isn’t etc. — but these aren’t the…
  • Let’s see what warnings TS and Flow are giving me:Typescript error messageFlow error messageTypescript clearly gives us the solution to fix the problem, whereas Flow just flags a type incompatibility.Errors on missing propsFor me this one is the biggest issues with Flow: Instead of having the error in the Title / component like…
  • Better yet, I could avoid this problem altogether in TS by taking advantage of with Atom and VS Code are fine, but from personal experience, Typescript remains faster than Flow, especially on large projects.So it looks like Typescript is clearly the best choice, or is it?Setup:If you have an existing project…
  • You’ll still need your unit and e2e tests to be sure that your app is running as expected.Both Flow and Typescript are awesome ❤ and I’m really happy that both of these solutions exist.

tldr; You’re not a machine. You just can’t catch all bugs and know your (and your team’s) code by heart and it’s not your job. So add static types! Ok, let’s clarify something here. If you spend your…
Continue reading “Typescript or Flow – Product at Home”

React’s Ecosystem as a flexible Framework

React's Ecosystem as a flexible Framework - RWieruch  #reactjs #javascript

  • But in the end, when implementing a larger application, you need a couple of more libraries to have a sophisticated web application with React as its core.
  • The following article will give you an opinionated approach to select from these libraries to build a sophisticated React application.
  • In plain JavaScript, it would be possible to create a React class attribute with conditionals:

    But it is so much easier with the classnames library:

    It works perfectly with CSS modules too.

  • Basically a fetch looks like the following, for instance in a React lifecycle method when a component mounts:

    Basically you wouldn’t have to add any other library to do the job.

  • However, there are common use cases for React’s higher order components that are already solved in a library called recompose.

React’s ecosystem is a flexible framework. The article gives you an opinionated ideal React setup choosing essential libraries…
Continue reading “React’s Ecosystem as a flexible Framework”

React’s Ecosystem as a flexible Framework

  • But in the end, when implementing a larger application, you need a couple of more libraries to have a sophisticated web application with React as its core.
  • The following article will give you an opinionated approach to select from these libraries to build a sophisticated React application.
  • In plain JavaScript, it would be possible to create a React class attribute with conditionals:

    But it is so much easier with the classnames library:

    It works perfectly with CSS modules too.

  • Basically a fetch looks like the following, for instance in a React lifecycle method when a component mounts:

    Basically you wouldn’t have to add any other library to do the job.

  • However, there are common use cases for React’s higher order components that are already solved in a library called recompose.

React’s ecosystem is a flexible framework. The article gives you an opinionated ideal React setup choosing essential libraries…
Continue reading “React’s Ecosystem as a flexible Framework”

Mobdux: Combining the good parts of MobX and Redux – Cameron Fletcher – Medium

  • In MobX it is easy to structure your stores in a tree-like manner so that at any point you can view the entire state of your application.
  • Additionally, by using MobX in strict mode, you are forced to make any mutations to your state in actions.
  • The combination of a single store, strict mode, and the excellent mobx-react-devtools help give back some of the predictability and traceability of Redux.One of the ways the libraries significantly diverge however, is when connecting your state to your components.
  • Redux on the other hand, recommends the smart component / dumb component pairing so that each component (regardless of where it sits in the hierarchy) can look up everything it needs to render itself.I prefer the Redux approach for a number of reasons:Easier to move things around in your component hierarchy.No pass-through props, where a component forwards props to its children despite not needing them for its own rendering.Easier to test / re-use / write storybook stories for the dumb components that are only interested in rendering.Dumb components are completely decoupled from Redux, allowing for re-usability if the consumer decides to change state frameworks (to MobX or relay for example).
  • Also, we can remove all knowledge of MobX from our dumb components by encapsulating all of this logic in our smart component wrapper, removing the need for the observer decorator entirely.

MobX and Redux give you two opposing ways to manage your state effectively in a React application. As an experiment I attempted to merge the good parts of both approaches, and ended up with a new…
Continue reading “Mobdux: Combining the good parts of MobX and Redux – Cameron Fletcher – Medium”

Maximizing Debuggability with Redux – LogRocket

Maximizing Debuggability with Redux  #javascript #react #logging #debugging #redux #reactjs

  • By using front end logging tools like LogRocket, developers can easily understand and fix tricky bugs in production by reviewing the actions and state changes leading up to a bug.While this information is immediately useful in any Redux app, there is a lot more we can achieve by architecting an app with logging in mind.
  • When debugging issues, we can dig into this state object to see information on in-flight requests, queryCount (if we’re polling on a query), and timings.Storing this information in Redux is critical, since it puts full context on all network activity in the Redux logs.Rolling your own data fetching “framework”If you’d prefer a simpler approach, you can roll your own data fetching “framework” by simply dispatching explicit actions when querying and receiving data from the network.For example, lets say we’re building a blogging app.
  • This would then update state appropriately to:postsQuery: { url: ‘api.blog.com/posts’, isPending: true, data: […],}This example is far from thorough, but the idea is that by being explicit with Redux actions for each part of the request lifecycle, it becomes easy to debug any potential race condition or network error.Handling other sources of non-determinismIn addition to network fetching, there are lots of other sources of non-determinism that can cause bugs.
  • For example:myWebSocket.onmessage = function (event) { store.dispatch({ type: ‘BLOG_POST_UPDATE_RECEIVED’, payload: event, } store.dispatch({ type: ‘BLOG_POST_UPDATE_RECEIVED’, payload: event, }That way, when looking at the Redux logs for an error or user-reported issue, we can see all the data that was received over the websocket and, crucially, relate it in time to other redux actions and network requests.Local StorageOften, an app needs to read from local storage when it first starts up.
  • Once you get the library set up, you’ll see a new key in your Redux store called routing with information on the current router state.In addition, react-router-redux dispatches actions like @@router/LOCATION_CHANGE when its state changes.Also of note is that using react-router-redux lets you rewind router state when time-traveling in redux-devtools, since its state its state is derived from the state in Redux.A note about local vs Redux stateI don’t want to get into the debate on local vs Redux state here, but production Redux logging does change the calculus of this decision in some cases.

In my last blog post, Redux Logging in Production, I discussed one of the most important benefits of using Redux — debuggability. By using front end logging tools like LogRocket, developers can…
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Intro To React Javascript Library – Nermien M. Barakat – Medium

Intro To React Javascript library for building user interfaces  #javascript #react #reactjs

  • SourceSites Using ReactFacebook, Instagram, Dropbox, NETFLIX, Airbnb, PayPal and More.Prerequisites to use react :Javascript basicsDeclaring variablesCreating and invoking functionsDOM the Document Object Model (basically how Javascript Talks to the Browser)ES2015Class syntaxArrow functionsspread operatorTo undstand some of the concepts under which React operates.React makes it painless to create interactive UIs.
  • Design simple views for each state in your application, and React will efficiently update and render just the right components when your data changes.
  • SourceI.e React is the V (View) in MVC that is used to render views like HTML pages dynamically based on some state, which is often in the form of data.
  • React then updates the generated views whenever the original state changes.Declarative views make your code more predictable and easier to debug.The virtual representation of views in memoryFor the browser’s case, we write HTML using JavaScript in React relying on the power of JavaScript to generate HTML that depends on some data, rather than enhancing HTML to make it work with that data.
  • SourceBuild encapsulated components that manage their own state, then compose them to make complex UIs.SourceSince component logic is written in JavaScript instead of templates, you can easily pass rich data through your app and keep state out of the DOM.Learn Once, Write AnywhereYou can develop new features in React without rewriting existing code.React can also render on the server using Node and power mobile apps using React Native.In order to write your first react components you have to be familiers with some of the features react offers like How to:Write React componentsRender data to the pageCommunicate components i.e pass data from one component to anther ?

React is declarative, efficient, and extremely flexible. What’s more, it works with the libraries and frameworks that you already know like jQuery’s UI plugin. React was built to solve one problem…
Continue reading “Intro To React Javascript Library – Nermien M. Barakat – Medium”