How to display Draft.js content as HTML – tuomo.me

How to display Draft.js content as HTML  #webdevelopment #webdev #ReactJS #react #javascript

  • At first however, it might not be so clear how to take the rich text representation that is created by Draft.js (=ContentState) and display it as HTML.
  • Draft.js itself doesn’t have an API to convert the content state to HTML.
  • One way to export your content state to HTML is to use npm package provides stateToHtml method which takes ContentState object as parameter and returns the content state as html.
  • Here is an example for a component that has Draft.js editor and as you type the editor’s content is displayed as html.
  • Getting HTML content of Draft.js editor is quite straight forward.

Continue reading “How to display Draft.js content as HTML – tuomo.me”

Vue.js vs. React.js: Comparing Two JavaScript UI Component Libraries

  • At a time where large MVC (model-view-controller) frameworks were cutting edge, two-way data binding was considered a feature, and SSR was mostly used for static webpages, React reversed the trend, focusing on building applications from encapsulated view components, one-way data binding, and using SSR on dynamic web pages via the…
  • Dependency tracking gives Vue’s virtual DOM a slight edge over React out of the box, because it can selectively re-render the child components that are actually affected by a change in state by default — no additional coding required.
  • In React, JSX breaks with the convention of keeping JavaScript and HTML separate, by providing a declarative XML-like syntax that allows you to create self-contained UI components that encapsulate all the instructions required to render them within the view: – – The React code above will render into a simple…
  • Under the React umbrella, we have Flux, the application architecture pattern Facebook developed as a state management solution to avoid issues like the infamous phantom unseen message bug, and Redux, a framework agnostic library for providing a simplified implementation of the Flux pattern, which replaces MVC (model-view-controller).
  • Both Vue and React are cutting edge UI component libraries that make use of a virtual DOM, embrace the components based future of web development, support SSR, and Universal JavaScript.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the key differences between the React.js and Vue.js JavaScript libraries, and learn which might be the best fit for your next web project.
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What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16:  by @xander76 #JavaScript #ReactJS #NodeJS

  • Naturally, this feature is also supported by React 16’s server-side rendering.So, you can now server-render components that look like this:class MyArrayComponent extends React.Component { render() { return [ div key=”1″first element/div, div key=”2″second element/div ]; }}class MyStringComponent extends React.Component { render() { return “hey there”; }}class MyNumberComponent extends React.Component {…
  • To learn more about this feature, read Dan Abramov’s post on the React blog about the change.React 16 SSR Doesn’t Support Error Boundaries or PortalsThere are two new features in the React 16 client-side renderer that are unfortunately not supported in the server-side renderer: Error Boundaries and Portals.
  • If for any reason there’s a mismatch, React raises a warning in development mode and replaces the entire tree of server-generated markup with HTML that has been generated on the client.In React 16, though, the client-side renderer uses a different algorithm to check that the server-generated markup is correct.
  • And when the client-side renderer in React 16 detects a markup mismatch, it only attempts to change the HTML subtree that doesn’t match, rather than the entire HTML tree.Generally, this change shouldn’t have much effect for end users, except for one fact: React 16 doesn’t fix mismatched SSR-generated HTML attributes…
  • This performance optimization means that you will need to make extra sure that you fix any markup mismatch warnings you see in your app in development mode.React 16 Doesn’t Need To Be Compiled For Best PerformanceIn React 15, if you used SSR straight out of the box, performance was less…

There are lots of exciting new bits (most notably the Fiber rewrite), but personally, I’m most excited about React 16’s many improvements that have been made to server-side rendering. Let’s take a…
Continue reading “What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon”

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in #ReactJS 16:  by @xander76 #JavaScript #NodeJS

  • Naturally, this feature is also supported by React 16’s server-side rendering.So, you can now server-render components that look like this:class MyArrayComponent extends React.Component { render() { return [ div key=”1″first element/div, div key=”2″second element/div ]; }}class MyStringComponent extends React.Component { render() { return “hey there”; }}class MyNumberComponent extends React.Component {…
  • To learn more about this feature, read Dan Abramov’s post on the React blog about the change.React 16 SSR Doesn’t Support Error Boundaries or PortalsThere are two new features in the React 16 client-side renderer that are unfortunately not supported in the server-side renderer: Error Boundaries and Portals.
  • If for any reason there’s a mismatch, React raises a warning in development mode and replaces the entire tree of server-generated markup with HTML that has been generated on the client.In React 16, though, the client-side renderer uses a different algorithm to check that the server-generated markup is correct.
  • And when the client-side renderer in React 16 detects a markup mismatch, it only attempts to change the HTML subtree that doesn’t match, rather than the entire HTML tree.Generally, this change shouldn’t have much effect for end users, except for one fact: React 16 doesn’t fix mismatched SSR-generated HTML attributes…
  • This performance optimization means that you will need to make extra sure that you fix any markup mismatch warnings you see in your app in development mode.React 16 Doesn’t Need To Be Compiled For Best PerformanceIn React 15, if you used SSR straight out of the box, performance was less…

There are lots of exciting new bits (most notably the Fiber rewrite), but personally, I’m most excited about React 16’s many improvements that have been made to server-side rendering. Let’s take a…
Continue reading “What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon”

Case study of SSR with React in a large e-commerce app – Jakob Lind

Case study of SSR with React in a large e-commerce app  #ReactJS

  • In this case study you will learn: – – In this case study, I present how we have implemented SSR (server side rendering) with React in an e-commerce application for one of Norway’s largest telco brands Telia.
  • What we have learned over the 3 years we have worked with the app is that keeping things simple helps a lot when implementing and maintaining an SSR solution.
  • The theory of SSR is pretty simple: you just render your React components on the backend and send the generated HTML to the client.
  • We create our Redux store with the initialState on the backend like this: – – The initialState variable is also sent to the frontend in a global variable so that the client side app gets the exact same state prefetched.
  • Here are some examples of variables that we guard against on server side: – – The process for knowing when to add the guard is something like: – – We are also careful to only use dependencies that work with SSR.

Setting up SSR (server side rendering) with React is painful. There is no good overview or starting point. Instead, you have to gather pieces of information from googling and do your best to puzzle them together.
Continue reading “Case study of SSR with React in a large e-commerce app – Jakob Lind”

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in #ReactJS 16:  by @xander76 #JavaScript

  • Naturally, this feature is also supported by React 16’s server-side rendering.So, you can now server-render components that look like this:class MyArrayComponent extends React.Component { render() { return [ div key=”1″first element/div, div key=”2″second element/div ]; }}class MyStringComponent extends React.Component { render() { return “hey there”; }}class MyNumberComponent extends React.Component {…
  • To learn more about this feature, read Dan Abramov’s post on the React blog about the change.React 16 SSR Doesn’t Support Error Boundaries or PortalsThere are two new features in the React 16 client-side renderer that are unfortunately not supported in the server-side renderer: Error Boundaries and Portals.
  • If for any reason there’s a mismatch, React raises a warning in development mode and replaces the entire tree of server-generated markup with HTML that has been generated on the client.In React 16, though, the client-side renderer uses a different algorithm to check that the server-generated markup is correct.
  • And when the client-side renderer in React 16 detects a markup mismatch, it only attempts to change the HTML subtree that doesn’t match, rather than the entire HTML tree.Generally, this change shouldn’t have much effect for end users, except for one fact: React 16 doesn’t fix mismatched SSR-generated HTML attributes…
  • This performance optimization means that you will need to make extra sure that you fix any markup mismatch warnings you see in your app in development mode.React 16 Doesn’t Need To Be Compiled For Best PerformanceIn React 15, if you used SSR straight out of the box, performance was less…

There are lots of exciting new bits (most notably the Fiber rewrite), but personally, I’m most excited about React 16’s many improvements that have been made to server-side rendering. Let’s take a…
Continue reading “What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Hacker Noon”

What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Sasha Aickin – Medium

  • Naturally, this feature is also supported by React 16’s server-side rendering.So, you can now server-render components that look like this:class MyArrayComponent extends React.Component { render() { return [ div key=”1″first element/div, div key=”2″second element/div ]; }}class MyStringComponent extends React.Component { render() { return “hey there”; }}class MyNumberComponent extends React.Component {…
  • To learn more about this feature, read Dan Abramov’s post on the React blog about the change.React 16 SSR Doesn’t Support Error Boundaries or PortalsThere are two new features in the React 16 client-side renderer that are unfortunately not supported in the server-side renderer: Error Boundaries and Portals.
  • If for any reason there’s a mismatch, React raises a warning in development mode and replaces the entire tree of server-generated markup with HTML that has been generated on the client.In React 16, though, the client-side renderer uses a different algorithm to check that the server-generated markup is correct.
  • And when the client-side renderer in React 16 detects a markup mismatch, it only attempts to change the HTML subtree that doesn’t match, rather than the entire HTML tree.Generally, this change shouldn’t have much effect for end users, except for one fact: React 16 doesn’t fix mismatched SSR-generated HTML attributes…
  • This performance optimization means that you will need to make extra sure that you fix any markup mismatch warnings you see in your app in development mode.React 16 Doesn’t Need To Be Compiled For Best PerformanceIn React 15, if you used SSR straight out of the box, performance was less…

There are lots of exciting new bits (most notably the Fiber rewrite), but personally, I’m most excited about React 16’s many improvements that have been made to server-side rendering. Let’s take a…
Continue reading “What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 – Sasha Aickin – Medium”

Things to like in @stenciljs: – Compiles to #WebComponents – #TypeScript by default – JSX familiar to #Reactjs devs

  • The extension is required since Stencil components are built using JSX and TypeScript.
  • Here is an example of what a Stencil component looks like:

    Once compiled, this component can be used in HTML just like any other tag.

  • This decorator provides metadata about our component to the Stencil compiler.
  • This decorator tells the compiler that the property is public to the component, and the user should be setting it.
  • If a user of our component were to change the element’s property, our component would fire it’s function again, updating the displayed content.

Stencil components are created by adding a new file with a .tsx extension, such as my-first-component.tsx, and placing them in the src/components directory.
The .tsx extension is required since Stencil components are built using JSX and TypeScript.
Continue reading “Things to like in @stenciljs:
– Compiles to #WebComponents
– #TypeScript by default
– JSX familiar to #Reactjs devs”

Beginners Guide into ReactJS

  • See React as HTML inside Javascript which brought about JSX(Javascript XML) we’ll discuss more on that later.
  • A React component is a single object that not only outputs HTML like a traditional template would, but also includes all the code needed to control that output.
  • As you can see, the component approach means that both HTML and JavaScript code live in the same file.
  • In React, mutable state is typically kept in the state property of components, and only updated with , They are referred to has

    Let’s quickly go through the below code.

  • The render method consist of a form element that has an input field and also a submit button below, The input field has the onChange function that takes in , this method takes in as a parameter which happens to be the DOM event handler, and gets the result from , is one of the component API methods which is use to update state value, with this as a user types into the input field, the value will be updated in state.

Dive into React with this Quick Start Guide. Differences between Props and State
Continue reading “Beginners Guide into ReactJS”

Marko vs React: An In-depth Look – Patrick Steele-Idem – Medium

Marko vs React: An In-depth Look  #MarkoJS #reactjs

  • In the sections below we will take a closer look at some of the differences between Marko and React.SyntaxBoth Marko and React JSX allow HTML markup and JavaScript to be combined into a single file and both support building web applications based on UI components.
  • The following Marko code is equivalent to the React JSX code above:Syntax: inline JavaScriptReact JSXReact JSX starts with JavaScript and allows XML elements to be inlined as shown below:MarkoMarko starts out in HTML, but it allows JavaScript to be inlined in a clean and maintainable way.
  • Here’s how the Marko syntax options compare:Marko HTML syntaxMarko concise syntaxMarko mixed syntaxThe HTML syntax and the concise syntax can be used together:React JSXReact does not offer a concise syntax.ComponentsMarko starts with simple HTML and allows UI component logic to easily be layered on top.React JSXA React UI component is typically implemented as a class that extends React.Component:React also supports a more concise functional component:However, if state or lifecycle events are needed then a functional UI component must be converted to a class component:MarkoHere is the same component in Marko:Behavior can easily be added to any Marko UI component:Marko also allows JavaScript behavior, CSS styling and HTML markup to be embedded in the Marko template as a single file UI component:APIMarko compiles component to JavaScript modules that export an API for rendering the component as shown below:The same UI component can be rendered to a stream such as a writable HTTP response stream:The user’s of a Marko UI component do not need to know that the component was implemented using Marko.Contrast this with React as an example:On top of that, React requires that a different module be imported to render the exact same UI component on the server:Custom tagsReact JSXWith React, all custom tags for UI components must be explicitly imported:MarkoMarko supports a mechanism for automatically discovering custom tags for UI components based on the project directory structure.
  • While Babel allows code transformations of JavaScript, the Marko compiler provides support for resolving custom tags declaratively and the Marko AST provides for very powerful and simple transformations as shown in the following code for rendering Markdown to HTML at markdown tag can then be used as shown below:In this example, after the template is compiled, the marked library is no longer needed at render-time.
  • Marko provides first-class support for the Atom editor with syntax highlighting, Autocomplete for both HTML and custom tags, Hyperclick to quickly jump to referenced files and methods, and Pretty printing to keep your code readable.

In this article we will take an in-depth look at the differences and similarities between Marko and React from the perspective of the maintainers of Marko. Example • Similarities • Differences
Syntax…
Continue reading “Marko vs React: An In-depth Look – Patrick Steele-Idem – Medium”