Impress Your Friends With Code Splitting in React – Hacker Noon

Impress Your Friends With #Code Splitting in #ReactJS:  by @burkeholland #JavaScript

  • Both of those actions show the edit form.First I am going to add a spot in my state for this “EditForm” component to live.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { …, lazyEditHero: null } } …, render() { return ( … ) }}I put mine in…
  • I have put this in a function called LoadEditFormclass Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() { const { default : EditHero } = await import(‘.
  • /EditHero’); this.setState({ lazyEditHero: EditHero }) } render() { return ( … ) }}Now we just need to call this LoadEditForm from the two functions that trigger the editor component to be shown.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() {…
  • /EditHero’); this.setState({ lazyEditHero: EditHero }) } handleSelect = async hero = { await this.LoadEditForm(); this.setState({ selectedHero: hero }); } handleEnableAddMode = async () = { await this.LoadEditForm(); this.setState({ addingHero: true, selectedHero: { id: ”, name: ”, saying: ” } }); } … render() { return ( … ) }}A few…
  • This also allows us to pass any props to our component when it is so lazily loaded.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() { const { default : EditHero } = await import(‘.

In preparation for the DevUp keynote a few weeks ago, I took some time to learn the minimum amount possible to demonstrate code splitting in React. Now your first reaction is probably… As part of the…
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The Three Pigs: how to structure your React-Redux application – Frontend Weekly

The Three Pigs: how to structure React-Redux application  #react #redux #javascript #reactjs

  • /src /components /containers /actions /reducers /sagasThis is the obvious layout and the one that’s most people’s go-to: group the same ”type” of things together.
  • Besides, some things just belong together: you’d never use the ToDoItemList container with a different component so should they really be living in different parts of the codebase?The Wooden House: Group by FeatureIn the second project, having learned some good learnings from our straw house approach, we decided to do a 180: rather than separating all of our Redux bits based on what they do, we grouped them all together by the feature in which they belong.
  • /src /components /PureComponent1 index.js index.spec.js style.css /PureComponent2 index.js index.spec.js style.css /PureComponent3 /features /feature1 component.js container.js actions.js reducer.js saga.js /feature2 /feature3This layout minimises jumping around in the codebase when developing features.
  • It is also easy to end up with just one or two bulky “features” that encompass the entire application.The Stone House: Group by FunctionThe stone house layout basically appeared by letting the codebase grow naturally.
  • We are now 4 months into the project and this is what we’ve come up with:/src /components /Component1 index.js — may be a pure component or a component wrapped in a container, the consumer doesn’t care anyway index.spec.js /Component2 /Component3 /reducers index.js /Reducer1 index.js — actions are in the same file as reducers index.spec.js someSideEffect.js — we use redux-loop here /Reducer2 /Reducer3Whereas this way of laying out the application may look a bit hard to grasp initially, it’s worked out really well for us so far.

Defining any kind of “good practices” in tech is always a tricky business. Good practices are subjective, heavily dependent to your ways of working and often your personal preference. The best we can…
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The Life Cycle Recap · react-indepth

#reactjs lifecycle flowchart by @pbesh from

  • We have now worked through the three phases of the React life cycle: Birth/Mounting, Growth/Update and finally Death/Unmount.
  • By having these phases and corresponding methods React provides us a clear path for developing Components.
  • These phases also allow us to begin to optimize our Components and our entire application.
  • To review, the methods and order called are:

    In addition, this flow chart by Peter Beshai breaks down the different methods and also calls out when is safe and NOT safe to call:

We have now worked through the three phases of the React life cycle: Birth/Mounting, Growth/Update and finally Death/Unmount. By having these phases and corresponding methods React provides us a clear path for developing Components. These phases also allow us to begin to optimize our Components and our entire application.
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From Zero to Redux in 3 Minutes – Christian – Medium

Go from zero to #Redux in 3 minutes:  #ReactJS #JavaScript

  • /src/store project structure will now look like this:my-app/src ├── App.css ├── App.js ├── App.test.js ├── index.css ├── index.js ├── logo.svg └── store ├── actions.js ├── index.js └── reducers.jsStep 2 of 4 — ActionsNext, we’re going to define some actions.
  • We’ll use these actions later in our component event handlers to manipulate data in the store.
  • Second, we’re defining and exporting an actions object, in which we’ve defined a function to pass data along to our reducer.Step 3 of this file we’ll create and export our reducers.
  • Reducers are used to determine how data in the Redux store is updated.Step 4 of 4 — Store and we import our reducers, combine them into a single “root reducer”, and create our store.
  • Next let’s look at using our Redux store by connecting it to components and dispatching actions.

For some reason I have a hard time remembering the basic steps required to set up Redux with React. I find the official documentation hard to follow, so I’ve written a simplified guide for the sake…
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ReactJS Form Validation Approaches

POSTED: Two approaches to form validation with @reactjs and @jmalfatto 



#javascript

  • In summary, the first approach benefits from its simple reliance on the “constraint validation” API, which is already a standard in modern browsers .
  • The first approach relies on the browser’s constraint validation API and actually provides a lot of control via the ValidityState object and setCustomValidity method, which occur in modern browsers on each input element.
  • React alone is relatively bare-bones when it comes to supporting form validation.
  • But we may very well want more control over validation than browser API’s alone afford us.
  • The second approach relies on react-redux-form , a third-party library that integrates form data from React components into a Redux store.

As a web developer who is relatively new to ReactJS, I take for granted the built-in support for form validation that I’ve enjoyed in other JavaScript frameworks, like Angular and Sencha. What follows is an elaboration on this problem, as well as a discussion of two approaches to solving it in React, on which I experimented for the same basic form design.
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The Complete Web Development Tutorial Using React and Redux Coupon Save 67 %

The Complete Web Development Tutorial Using React and Redux
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#reactjs

  • It allows the developer to write apps regardless of the environment, resulting in more consistently running apps.
  • Redux is a predictable state container for JavaScript apps.
  • In order for a change to be made, an action is emitted, which does not result in the state of the app to be changed but rather a new object to be returned.
  • The course answers questions such as what is React and its basic features such as components, state, properties and lifecycle; what is Redux and its basic features such as state, store and reducers; and even how to combine them together to create a brilliant app.
  • The course includes everything you need to know about React and Redux.

Coupon 100 10 15 75 Master the professional web development techniques using React and Redux
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Performance optimisations for React applications – Alex Reardon – Medium

Performance optimizations for #ReactJS apps:

  • It is the responsibility of this function to return true if the component should update and false if the component should not update.
  • Using tools will help you find performance hotspots specific to your application.
  • Anything else you can think of that avoids creating a new function every time render is called!
  • Every component in React has a shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) function.
  • Generally applications want to promote loose coupling (components know as little about other components as possible).

The main performance hotspot in React applications is redundant processing and DOM diffing in components. In order to avoid this return false from shouldComponentUpdate as high up in your application…
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