How to use React’s Provider Pattern

How to use React's Provider Pattern  #reactjs #webdev

  • Therefore you could use React’s context to give every component access to the colored theme.
  • That way every component that needs to be styled according to the colored theme could get the necessary information from React’s context object.
  • You have the Provider component that makes properties accessible in React’s context and components that consume the context.
  • This Provider component uses React’s context to pass down the state implicitly.
  • You provide the state to your component as props, the component wraps it into React’s context and all child components can access the state by using a higher order component such as from the react-redux library.

This article gives you a walkthrough for React’s provider pattern. After reading it, you should be able to implement…
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JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functions – LeanJS – Medium

JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functions  #react #arrowfunctions #es6 #javascript #reactjs

  • JavaScript: The beauty of arrow functionsArrow functions are an awesome ES6 language feature for a number of reasons, but we believe there are 3 key reasons they really shine:They are more conciseThey allow for implicit returnsThey get their “this” value from the context, meaning it comes from the callerLet’s look at some ES5 vs ES6 code:In the above code example we compare the ES5 and ES6 way of grabbing some values from an array of objects.More ConciseThe most striking thing is the amount of code, less code means less probability of introducing errors.
  • Secondly it’s obvious that our arrow function has improved readability here, it’s also more declarative.
  • Being concise and declarative with code is especially important when working in teams, it saves time and improves outcomes.Implicit returnsThe ability to return values implicitly builds upon the first point, we no longer need to add extra syntax such as the {} and return keyword if they are not needed.
  • So context is simply the one who is calling the function.If this isn’t clear, have a play with the code yourself here: why is getting the “this” value from the context useful?Before we had to bind our functions explicitly to make sure they had the right “this” value:We can of course continue doing this, but now we have a more concise way of doing the same thing:Summing upUsing arrow functions allows us to use a more concise and declarative syntax while eliminating the need for us to bind them explicitly.
  • There are of course a few more things to know about arrow functions which are beyond the scope of this post.

Arrow functions are an awesome ES6 language feature for a number of reasons, but we believe there are 3 key reasons they really shine: In the above code example we compare the ES5 and ES6 way of…
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How to use React’s Provider Pattern

  • Therefore you could use React’s context to give every component access to the colored theme.
  • That way every component that needs to be styled according to the colored theme could get the necessary information from React’s context object.
  • You have the Provider component that makes properties accessible in React’s context and components that consume the context.
  • This Provider component uses React’s context to pass down the state implicitly.
  • You provide the state to your component as props, the component wraps it into React’s context and all child components can access the state by using a higher order component such as from the react-redux library.

This article gives you a walkthrough for React’s provider pattern. After reading it, you should be able to implement…
Continue reading “How to use React’s Provider Pattern”

“Thinking in React” — A paradox statement – Sebastian K – Medium

Thinking in #ReactJS: A paradox statement  #JavaScript

  • But before we investigate further, let’s take a step back and think about the three basic principles of React components.React Components — Three Basic PrinciplesOther devs and I have identified three principles which should be the foundation for all React components:A component should be a pure function which transforms data into a user interface.
  • But what if multiple dumb components rely on the same data and should display updates to that data synchronously?Data Flow in ReactA simple React component treeLet’s take the component tree above as an example to study the way we move data around inside a React application.
  • This means that we have created a coupling between the target of our data (C and D) and all the components between these targets and their common state container (the root component).
  • There is a solution for this problem though, and its name is Context.Context to the Rescue!Context allows us to transform the root component into a context provider, which would then provide data for other components further down the tree without having to pass down this data explicitly the whole way to the target components.
  • You can read more about this in this article of MobX creator Michel Weststrate.In addition, the React documentation states that Context is an unstable API and recommends using a simple Provider component at the top of your hierarchy and using Higher Order Components to create the consumers which will then pass down the data to the actually consuming dumb components they wrap.

Managing state in React is a solved problem. Or is it? Dozens of state libraries exist, but why can we not simply use the tools React itself provides us?
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Use create-react-native-app to Set Up a Simple React Native App

  • React Native requires a lot of initial set up to get an app going.
  • After creating the project we will run the development server which will print a QR code on the terminal.
  • We will install the app called on our mobile phone and use it to scan the QR code.
  • This will load our app on our mobile phone in development mode.
  • When make adjustments to our project the changes will be reflected on our phone.

React Native requires a lot of initial set up to get an app going. In this lesson, we will use create-react-native-app to do this initial setup for us. We will install create-react-native-app globally and create a new project.
After creating the project we will run the development server which will print a QR code on the terminal. We will install the app called Expo Client on our mobile phone and use it to scan the QR code.
This will load our app on our mobile phone in development mode. When make adjustments to our project the changes will be reflected on our phone. If we use console.log the messages will be printed in our terminal.
Download the Expo Client from App Store (https://itunes.apple.com/app/apple-store/id982107779?pt=17102800&ct=www&mt=8) or Google Play (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=host.exp.exponent&referrer=www)

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Introducing React Native support for Radar – On the Radar

Introducing React Native support for Radar:  #ReactJS #JavaScript

  • Introducing React Native support for RadarBy popular demand, we’re excited to introduce React Native support for Radar on iOS and Android.React Native is a framework from Facebook that lets you build mobile apps using only JavaScript.
  • It abstracts away cross-platform differences, much like Radar abstracts away cross-platform differences between location services on iOS and Android.Now it’s easier than ever to add location tracking and context to your React Native apps.
  • After you sign up for Radar, create geofences, and configure your projects, you can start tracking users and receiving events with just a few lines of code:If you’d like to learn more, see the documentation and source on GitHub or get the react-native-radar package on npm.Happy coding!

React Native is a framework from Facebook that lets you build mobile apps using only JavaScript. It abstracts away cross-platform differences, much like Radar abstracts away cross-platform…
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Setup React Native for iOS and Android

Setup React Native for iOS and Android

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  • We’ll also setup Android, Android Studio and get the project running on an emulator with the react-native run-android command.
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  • In the lesson we’ll walk through the process of installing the react-native-cli through setting up a basic react-native project on iOS. We’ll get the basic project running in a simulator via XCode.
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In this lesson we’ll walk through the process of installing the react-native-cli through setting up a basic react-native project on iOS. We’ll get the basic project running in a simulator via XCode. We’ll also setup Android, Android Studio and get the project running on an emulator with the react-native run-android command.
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