Sharing React Components Easily with Bit — SitePoint

  • Bit is an open-source project that enables us to instantly share components from our existing source code with our team, and use them across our different projects without changing our source code, file structure or the tools we work with.
  • Sharing Components with Bit – If you haven’t heard of Bit’s latest release, it’s an open-source project that allows us to share components from our existing source code with our team and across projects.
  • By decoupling the representation of components from our actual file structure, Bit tracks the components within our source code and enables us to quickly turn any file or subset of files into a reusable component.
  • js – #Tracked 24 new components – – – – The next thing we want to do is to commit our changes: – bit commit -am ‘committed my first tracked code components’ – – – – The next step is exporting our components into a remote organized collection (Scope), sharing…
  • To organize your own components into shared collections, feel free to get started with Bit or visit the project on GitHub.

Jonathan explains how to share React components with a team and across different projects — without changing source code, file structure or tooling.
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We’re ready for your Lightning Talks submissions – React Day Berlin – Medium

We're ready for your 🌩 Lightning Talks submissions!  #ReactJS #ReactDayBerlin

  • We’re ready for your Lightning Talks submissionsReact Day Berlin forecast: 🌩 A chance of snow and thunderous applauseReact developers sometimes have to deal with tough situations, but making small talk with your fellow geeks has never been one of them.
  • Do you have a project you’d like to discuss with / pitch to an audience but a full talk would be too much for now?
  • React Day Berlin is ready for you, anyway.📩 Submit your Lightning TalkAs always, all winning speakers will get to attend React Day Berlin for free.
  • We’ll pick 4 of all proposals that’ll make the most sense in our lineup.Local developers and React newbies are especially welcome to submit.
  • In case you need help figuring out and fine-tuning your talk, we’re here for you.Each talk is limited to 5–7 minutes without QA.All winning proposals will be published on our website and here on Medium and also promoted through our social channels.Talks are subject to the Berlin Code of Conduct….

React developers sometimes have to deal with tough situations, but making small talk with your fellow geeks has never been one of them. Well, there’s no need to discuss the weather when the scene is…
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#React Components – Zero To Hero Series – Part 2 by Vipul Jain cc @CsharpCorner #ReactJS

#React Components - Zero To Hero Series - Part 2 by Vipul Jain cc @CsharpCorner  #ReactJS

  • This is the second article in the ReactJS – Zero to Hero Series.
  • I recommend reading the first article (link given below), before going through this article.
  • In this article, we will see the explanation of React Components.
  • Components are the fundamental units of a React application.
  • Now, with this basic understanding, in the next articles, we will see more about Populating Props, Composing components, State, Default props and Validating props.

This is the second article in ReactJS – Zero to Hero Series. I will recommend you read the first article (link given below), before going through this article.
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From native to React Native

  • After developing mobile applications for more than eight months, I had the opportunity of joining a project that was being developed using React Native, an open source JavaScript library that, according to its documentation, lets you build mobile apps using only JavaScript.
  • React Native it’s a very new technology announced on the beginning of 2015 – just a couple years ago – where the main objective is to allow the development of mobile apps using the same design as React, letting you compose a rich mobile UI from declarative components.
  • There were a lot of things that I enjoyed about developing a React Native app, like the flexibility that you can get out of JavaScript after get used on how it works and the core concepts of React.
  • I had a really great time working with React Native and after developing the base components I felt that creating new screens was even faster than coding on native languages.
  • Another great factor that makes it easy to develop apps using React Native is the fact that the JavaScript community is huge, this means lots and lots of knowledge shared on Stack Overflow.

React Native main objective is to allow the development of mobile apps using the same design as React.
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Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

☞ 

#reactjs

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React application: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • Once you’ve done that you can always import files relative to the directory:

    Whilst this does tie your application code to Webpack, I think it’s a worthwhile trade-off because it makes your code much easier to follow and imports much easier to add, so this is a step I’ll take with all new projects.

  • For example, we have a folder called that contains all components relating to the shopping cart view, and a folder called that contains code for listing things users can buy on a page.
  • Following on from the previous rule, we stick to a convention of one React component file, and the component should always be the default export.
  • Normally our React files look like so:

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications :picking tools, structuring files,and breaking components up into smaller pieces
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Why build your forms with Redux Form – DailyJS – Medium

Why build your forms with #Redux Form:  #ReactJS

  • Why build your forms with Redux FormWhen I usually create forms for my React/Redux applications I tend to keep the value of the inputs on the application state, with little to no editing, (because my forms are usually simple), I never stopped to realize what that means.
  • It also receives an event handler that will update the state when the user interacts with it.It means that when the user types the letter “J” on the input, what is visible is not the same “J”, it may be an identical “J” that comes from the state, or whatever the event handler has put in there.Ok but, that doesn’t answer the first questionBy having all the application state in the JavaScript app and using controlled components we get a single source of truth and take full control over the application behavior.In the context of a form, our React component is able to:do instant validation;control the input value format;enable, disable, show or hide components given the state;handle dynamic inputs.Although it is highly recommended to use controlled components, it is also good to point the drawback that you will have to create event handlers for all your inputs and that may be a bunch of code that doesn’t make sense to the application.What about Redux Form?Now that is known why to keep the form data in the state and you reason if that makes sense for your application we can come back to our main subject.
  • It keeps track of all common application form state such as:The fields that are in the form;The values of each field;The focused field;If the field values are valid;The fields that the user have interacted with;If the form is being submitted;If is happening any asynchronous validation.Let’s take a look at a bit of code and see how to do a setup.Here we connect the form component to Redux by decorating it with the high-order component reduxForm.
  • It will also hand us the handleSubmit function, which will take care of the submission behavior.The Field component takes our input component as its props and acts as a container, bringing the application state to the input component and binding the event handlers to update the state in store.Look at the InputText component to see the props we receive from the Field.One important point is that it’s still a developer’s responsibility to write the form and inputs components, this way the library does not take the flexibility from you to manage the behaviors of your form the way you want, or even add custom ones.And to finish our integration we add a reducer that will handle the state changes of your form.Simple isn’t it.Just one more point.
  • Look that the default value of the input is defined when the high-order component reduxForm is called and comes to the input within the prop input and not from the react’s prop defaultValue, this way we guarantee that our form values are all represented in the application state.In summary, having all your form data in application state gives you control over its behavior and you can easily implement that on a React/Redux application with Redux Form.I have created a repository on GitHub with the implementation above.

When I usually create forms for my React/Redux applications I tend to keep the value of the inputs on the application state, with little to no editing, (because my forms are usually simple), I never…
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Why ReactJs? – (┛◉Д◉)┛彡┻━┻ – Medium

Why ReactJs?  #react #reactjs

  • Instead of writing an html line for news, messenger and marketplace you can see that they are basically the same, the only thing that changes is the icon and the information so we can make a component called nav that receives information and an icon.
  • Let code this component:First, we are going to make its container, with an JSON object with the information we want to be see.Now we are going to do the component:Using this practice, we are able to create a web app by just iterating a JSON object, that will pass the information to the containers.Another cool thing of react is its community.
  • There is a lot of components already made so you can just add them to your project as easily as adding a library to your normal html code.
  • Some github repositories that have a lot of components are:· lot of people have a problem with HTML being mixed with JS because they feel like breaking separation of concerns but in reality, it is more of a separation of technologies rather than concerns.
  • It helps your application to be more efficient because you don’t need to repeat code, there is an amazing community behind it, it has some really awesome modules that helps you to manage the unidirectional data flow, as well as managing which component must be render and if it is a component that is visible in all of the pages such as a menu to just render it once instead of every time you change of page.Tldr: react is awesome.

React is a new JavaScript library developed by Facebook released in 2013, but it wasn’t until 2017 that react was stable. React is like the best of both worlds, it has the functionality of JavaScript…
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