Code Splitting with React and React Router

Code Splitting with React and React Router  #reactjs #React #reactrouter

  • Code splitting has gained popularity recently for its ability to allow you to split your app into separate bundles your users can progressively load.
  • In this post we’ll take a look at not only what code splitting is and how to do it, but also how to implement it with React Router.
  • You already split your app into different routes, so adding in code splitting on top of that feels pretty natural.
  • Instead of thinking about code splitting as splitting your app up by its routes, you should think of it as splitting your app up by its components ( s are just components, after all).
  • You already know how to dynamically import modules with , now you just need to figure out which components in your app you can hold off downloading until your user needs them.

Code splitting has gained popularity recently for its ability to allow you to split your app into separate bundles your users can progressively load. In this post we’ll take a look at not only what code splitting is and how to do it, but also how to implement it with React Router.
Continue reading “Code Splitting with React and React Router”

Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs

  • If you’re using Create React App, Next.js, Gatsby, or a similar tool you will have a Webpack setup out of the box to bundle your app.
  • You need to keep an eye on the code you are including in your bundle so that you don’t accidentally make it so large that your app takes a long time to load.
  • When Webpack comes across this syntax, it automatically start code-splitting your app.
  • You want to make sure you choose places that will split bundles evenly, but not be terribly interuptive to the users of your app.
  • Here’s an example of how to setup route-based code splitting into your app using libraries like React Router and React Loadable.

Most React apps will have their files “bundled” using tools like
Webpack or Browserify.
Bundling is the process of following imported files and merging them into a
single file: a “bundle”. This bundle can then be included on a webpage to load
an entire app at once.
Continue reading “Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs”

Impress Your Friends With Code Splitting in React – Hacker Noon

Impress Your Friends With #Code Splitting in #ReactJS:  by @burkeholland #JavaScript

  • Both of those actions show the edit form.First I am going to add a spot in my state for this “EditForm” component to live.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { …, lazyEditHero: null } } …, render() { return ( … ) }}I put mine in…
  • I have put this in a function called LoadEditFormclass Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() { const { default : EditHero } = await import(‘.
  • /EditHero’); this.setState({ lazyEditHero: EditHero }) } render() { return ( … ) }}Now we just need to call this LoadEditForm from the two functions that trigger the editor component to be shown.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() {…
  • /EditHero’); this.setState({ lazyEditHero: EditHero }) } handleSelect = async hero = { await this.LoadEditForm(); this.setState({ selectedHero: hero }); } handleEnableAddMode = async () = { await this.LoadEditForm(); this.setState({ addingHero: true, selectedHero: { id: ”, name: ”, saying: ” } }); } … render() { return ( … ) }}A few…
  • This also allows us to pass any props to our component when it is so lazily loaded.class Heroes extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { … lazyEditHero: null } } async LoadEditForm() { const { default : EditHero } = await import(‘.

In preparation for the DevUp keynote a few weeks ago, I took some time to learn the minimum amount possible to demonstrate code splitting in React. Now your first reaction is probably… As part of the…
Continue reading “Impress Your Friends With Code Splitting in React – Hacker Noon”

Writing Server-rendered React Apps with Next.js — SitePoint

Writing Server-rendered #ReactJS Apps with Next.js:  by @sitepointdotcom #JavaScript

  • This gets you all the dependencies you need for starting: – $ npm install next react react-dom –save – – Create a directory for your app, and inside that create a directory called pages.
  • js inside your project with these contents: – export default () = ( – divHello, Next!
  • So, you just have a style component inside your React Component render function: – export default () = ( – div – Hello world – pThese colors are scoped!
  • So, you can write code like this that dynamically loads a React component after initial load: – import dynamic from ‘next/dynamic’ – – const = dynamic( – { – loading: () = pThe component is loading…/p – } – ) – – export default () = – div – Header…
  • Next renders pages on the server, and they can be loaded just like good old rendered web pages when JavaScript is disabled.

Jatin Shridhar pushes through JS framework fatigue to introduce Next.js, a simple yet customizable solution to building production-ready SPAs.
Continue reading “Writing Server-rendered React Apps with Next.js — SitePoint”

Writing Server-rendered React Apps with Next.js — SitePoint

  • This gets you all the dependencies you need for starting: – $ npm install next react react-dom –save – – Create a directory for your app, and inside that create a directory called pages.
  • js inside your project with these contents: – export default () = ( – divHello, Next!
  • So, you just have a style component inside your React Component render function: – export default () = ( – div – Hello world – pThese colors are scoped!
  • So, you can write code like this that dynamically loads a React component after initial load: – import dynamic from ‘next/dynamic’ – – const = dynamic( – { – loading: () = pThe component is loading…/p – } – ) – – export default () = – div – Header…
  • Next renders pages on the server, and they can be loaded just like good old rendered web pages when JavaScript is disabled.

Jatin Shridhar pushes through JS framework fatigue to introduce Next.js, a simple yet customizable solution to building production-ready SPAs.
Continue reading “Writing Server-rendered React Apps with Next.js — SitePoint”

My Experience With Progressive Web Apps – Renganatha Arunachalam – Medium

My Experience With Progressive Web Apps  #webpack #progressivewebapp #react #reactjs

  • They are the future.I built a Progress Web App of WhatsApp Web using Webpack 2.0, React and Express.Note: This is not a complete clone of WhatsApp Web but minimal one to have an understanding of how to create a PWA app.Case StudyMain aim of PWA apps should be making the load time of webapp faster.Server Side RendingServer Side Rendering (App shell architecture) is a way of making the load time faster without JavaScript .
  • Sample Code of match api from react-routerBundlingVarious ways are available to bundle the app with minimum size using Webpack.I say separating the vendor libraries and components is the best way to reduce the bundling size.
  • The remaining two bundles are precisely due to code splitting.react-router can be used for Route based splitting out of box with WebpackWorkers From WebWeb workers and Service workers are most useful feature from web.
  • Both the workers have no access to DOM.Web Workers are use to do heavy operation in separate thread of browser and return result to the web app.Service workers are useful for caching the request.
  • All three attributes are used for loading the scripting without blocking onLoad function.Use Web manifest.json to have Native feel when users does Add to Home Screen in Mobile.Use LightHouse Chrome extension to validate your websiteUseful ArticlesProgressive web app with with React.js — Four LiteUber ClonePrefer defer over AsyncGetting most out of CommonChunksPluginVendor and Code Splitting in WebpackUseful webpack pluginsThe Offline CookbookHttp Browser Caching

Progressive Web Apps is a paradigm to make webapp more efficient on mobile devices. They are the future. Note: This is not a complete clone of WhatsApp Web but minimal one to have an understanding of…
Continue reading “My Experience With Progressive Web Apps – Renganatha Arunachalam – Medium”

React, routing, and data fetching – Jimmy Jia – Medium

#ReactJS, routing, and data fetching:

  • Performing data loading in parallel across route boundaries would require a route component to be explicitly aware of all of its possible child route components, and would limit reusability.
  • The ideal solution is to fetch all data and code in parallel after navigating to a new set of routes.
  • The getData method can return a promise that resolves to the remote data for the route.
  • After the code bundles have been loaded, we can use the Router middleware API to fetch data for all the routes in parallel.
  • In React Router v2 and v3, we can use the getComponent method on routes to load split-out code bundles in parallel.

In React applications at scale, routing, data fetching, and code splitting are naturally linked. The upcoming React Router v4 sacrifices the ability to optimally handle data fetching and code…
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Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting

Building the World Bank data site as a fast loading, single-page app:  #ReactJS

  • We can define our split points in the lazy load code.
  • Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting
  • We can create chunks in two steps: define split points in routes and use react router’s match in both client side and server side.
  • We can create on demand load chunks by define split point in our code.
  • React router allows us to use lazy load route-related code, also called dynamic routing.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Building the World Bank data site as a fast loading, single-page app: #ReactJS”


Code splitting is a slick way to reduce initial file requests and speed up your load time. We’re using it for building a massive single-page app for the World Bank.


Building the World Bank data site as a fast-loading, single-page app with code splitting