The Official Microsoft ASP.NET Site

  • The product(s) you are about to install leverage the Web Platform Installer (WebPI) for installation.
  • By downloading and using the Web Platform Installer (WebPI), you agree to the license terms and privacy statement for WebPI.
  • This installer will contact Microsoft over the Internet to retrieve product information.
  • WebPI uses the Microsoft Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP), which is turned on by default, see privacy statement for more information.
  • To view which software uses CEIP, see here.

Home of the Microsoft ASP.NET development community. Download Visual Studio, post to the forums, read ASP.NET blogs and learn about ASP.NET.
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Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server. We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS props using Next.js’ getInitialProps lifecycle hook.
Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages. Once finished, we’ll deploy our application to a live URL using the now-cli npm module.
Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js by @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server. We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS props using Next.js’ getInitialProps lifecycle hook.
Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages. Once finished, we’ll deploy our application to a live URL using the now-cli npm module.
Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

React-motion 101: Springs – Bjorn Holdt – Medium

React-motion 101: Springs  #reactjs #reactmotion #javascript #react #animation #reactjs

  • Box 2 is different.
  • Instead the law of physics, in particular a spring, was used to create the animation.
  • You can tell a spring was used because towards the end of the animation, it takes a while for the box to settle into its final position.
  • Box 1, 3 and 4 animation will look a bit jarring if we interrupt it.
  • Box 2 on the other hand handles the change gracefully and naturally springs into its new position (play around with these values on codepen)Stiffness and damping to change animationIn a spring animation, there are two variables you can control: stiffness and damping.

Boxes 1, 3 and 4 all used different timing functions (ease-in, ease-out, linear). However, they were all timed animations set to run for 500ms. Box 2 is different. The animation wasn’t set to run for…
Continue reading “React-motion 101: Springs – Bjorn Holdt – Medium”

Laravel Frontend Presets – Taylor Otwell – Medium

  • This gives developers a quick, convenient starting point for building modern, robust JavaScript components for their applications.For Laravel 5.5, this scaffolding is still in place, but we’re introducing some additional options for frontend scaffolding via a new artisan preset command.ReactIf you love React, you will love Laravel 5.5.
  • Simply run the php artisan preset react command to swap out the Vue scaffolding with React scaffolding.
  • The default Mix configuration, components, and all other related files will be updated accordingly:Now, instead of an Example.vue component, your application will contain an Example.js React component:BootstrapSome users may not want any JavaScript scaffolding at all, but don’t want to lose the basic Bootstrap CSS scaffolding.
  • If that’s you, you can use the artisan preset bootstrap to only remove the Vue scaffolding:Remove All ScaffoldingSome users may even want to remove all frontend scaffolding.
  • The artisan preset none will remove all frontend scaffolding:I hope you enjoy these new options!

As many of you probably know, Laravel 5.4 ships with an Example.vue component in the resources/assets/js/components directory. In addition, Laravel Mix supports compiling single-file Vue components…
Continue reading “Laravel Frontend Presets – Taylor Otwell – Medium”

Creating a Custom, Maintainable React-Scripts Package – Helpful Human

Creating a Custom, Maintainable React-Scripts Package:  by @Canfie1d #ReactJS #JavaScript

  • When Facebook released Create React App(CRA), I was excited to be able to harness their knowledge of the build process in my applications.There was an issue, however.While create-react-app was an amazing boilerplate to kick off a project with, it didn’t include everything we needed to include in new React projects.
  • While using this method was considerably faster than setting up a new application from scratch or basic from a boilerplate, it was important to me that the application could still rely on updates from the React team.Powered with information gleaned from that experimentation, we set out to create a way to harness the power of CRA with the added benefit of including other dependencies we required out of the box.
  • This discovery was the key to unlocking our ability to harness CRA.We began reading through how Kitze, the author of custom-react-scripts, enabled the ability to use a custom scripts package and came across an undocumented code snippet in his documentation:create-react-app my-app –scripts-version CRA had an undocumented hook built into the API to override the default react-scripts with your own.
  • While custom-react-scripts is an amazing package for setting up projects with differing requirements, we only needed one specific set up for our team.Poised with new information, we forked CRA and began editing the react-scripts to include the missing pieces.
  • This was a major step in the right direction and is sure to drastically cut down on the time it takes to spin up a new application.Next StepsWhile the few modifications we added to react-scripts are nice, we have plans to expand helpful-react-scripts further to include other dependencies such as a custom linting configuration, react-axe, redux-responsive, a font loader, Webpack code chunking, and other progressive web application considerations such as offline-plugin and a service worker.We are also developing our own version of create-react-app called helpful-cli in order to extend the functionality of CRA into including optional front-end packages such as moment.js and lodash.js as well as backend boilerplate and configurations.Since publishing helpful-react-scripts to NPM, we’ve seen 1,600 downloads in the last month and could see that number rise as we add functionality and it becomes more stable.If you found helpful-react-scripts helpful to you, let us know!

At Helpful Human, we were looking for a new solution to quickly spin up new projects. We wanted to lean on Facebook’s knowledge of React, Webpack, and best practices surrounding the configuration and…
Continue reading “Creating a Custom, Maintainable React-Scripts Package – Helpful Human”

Setup authentication & authorization in Reactjs

Setup authentication & authorization in #ReactJS:

  • Create a folder called actions within the source folder and add a file called login .
  • We’ll add a default case.
  • So create a folder called reducers within source and add a file called login .
  • state , userData : [], error : “Invalid login” , timestamp : action .
  • Create a folder called stores within your source folder, add the store .

In this Tutorial you will learn how to Setup authentication & authorization in Reactjs we will also build an example app with authentication & authorization
Continue reading “Setup authentication & authorization in Reactjs”

Is React.js fast? Faster than {framework}? … or are there more relevant questions to be asking? – Medium

Is #ReactJS fast? Faster than {framework}? …or are there more relevant questions?

  • I wanted to know how happy people were with the frameworks they had used.
  • The results only represent a tiny fraction of the data I accumulated, so stay tuned for more observations and insights coming very soon!
  • Finally I propose a new library, redux-logic , which combines power and flexibility with simplicity.
  • I also have no easy way to create business logic that applies across many actions, so if I wanted to augment all actions to have a timestamp or unique ID, I’d have to include a call to that code in all action creators.
  • // the action creator will be bound to dispatch const fetchUser = id => ( { type: USER_FETCH, payload: id } ); // userEpics.js const fetchUserEpic = action$ => action$.ofType(FETCH_USER) .mergeMap(action => ajax.getJSON(` https://a/$ {action.payload}`) .map(user => ({ type: FETCH_USER_SUCCESS, payload: user })) .catch(err => ({ type: FETCH_USER_FAILED, payload: err, error: true })) .takeUntil( action$ .

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Is #ReactJS fast? Faster than {framework}? …or are there more relevant questions?”


I give training in React.js via CodeWinds, and one of the questions I’m often asked is whether it is faster than X?


Is React.js fast? Faster than {framework}? … or are there more relevant questions to be asking? – Medium