Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js - #react course by @tgrecojs

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server. We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS props using Next.js’ getInitialProps lifecycle hook.
Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages. Once finished, we’ll deploy our application to a live URL using the now-cli npm module.
Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js by @tgrecojs on @eggheadio

  • In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
  • Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
  • Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server.
  • We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS using Next.js’ lifecycle hook.
  • Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages.

In this course we we’ll see just how quickly next.js makes the process of building server-rendered ReactJS applications by creating and deploying an application that loads blog posts from the Google Blogger API.
Along the way we’ll learn about many of the amazing features Next.js provides for us out of the box, such as route prefetching and code-splitting, thus allowing us to spend more time developing and virtually no time setting up our environment.
Additionally, we’ll learn about the core concepts behind the framework and see how we can leverage them to create dynamic routes and integrate Material-UI on the server. We won’t have to worry about using any specific architecture to handle state, instead we will just pass our data as ReactJS props using Next.js’ getInitialProps lifecycle hook.
Throughout this course we will see why Next.js has gained such an amazing reputation as a “minimalist framework” by supplying users with “pretty” error messages. Once finished, we’ll deploy our application to a live URL using the now-cli npm module.
Continue reading “Build a Server-rendered ReactJS Application with Next.js from @tgrecojs on @eggheadio”

Learn Redux by coding a Mini-Redux – Jakob Lind

Do you think Redux is complicated? Learn Redux by coding your own mini-redux  #reactjs

  • The whole point with Redux is to have one single source of truth for your application state.
  • The state is stored as a plain Javascript object in one place: the Redux Store.
  • When Redux is used with React, it is the React components that get notified when state changes, and can re-render based on new content in the store.
  • We can copy/paste that example to test our own Redux implementation: – – Get the full code to run it on your machine by signing up to my email list below!
  • In the next blogpost, we will code the connect function which binds your Redux store to React components.

There are lots of resources for learning Redux. There is the official documentation, examples, tutorials, blog posts, boilerplates, Youtube videos, podcasts, etc… The list goes on. Even though we have so many great resources to learn from, new developers coming in still sometimes gets confused. It’s an overwhelming amount of content and it can be difficult to filter out the relevant stuff.
Continue reading “Learn Redux by coding a Mini-Redux – Jakob Lind”

Modern static site generation

  • There is this function called Server Side Rendering where you can produce static HTML content directly from a tree of React.js components.
  • At the time of reading this, this site will already be served by GitHub pages and the content you will see once you view the source it’s been generated by Gatsby.js.
  • Here’s my list:

    At the time that I started following them, all of them were in a very early stage and none of them could generate my site’s content the way I wanted and in the same way as my previous one so to not lose paths and certain functionalities.

  • Think of when you are caching the home page of a WordPress powered site and you are serving the cached content to every visitor.
  • Imagine that instead of having memcached caching your HTML in front of your WordPress site, you trigger a hook each time your database changes that will re-generate the frontend using Gatsby.

In this post, I will talk about static site generators. How they have evolved and why I switched from a Ghost powered site to Gatsby.js, a modern static site generator.
Continue reading “Modern static site generation”

How to build a React-Redux application with API-first CMS Contentful

How to build a #ReactJS #Redux application with API-first CMS Contentful:  #JavaScript

  • js with the followingreturn ( div{this.props.children}/div );Now go to the browser, refresh the page and see the changes.Fetch blog contentsNext we’ll integrate with Contentful so we can fetch and show blog posts dynamically.Steps to setup your Contentful accountSignup at Contentful (you can choose Free package, that will be sufficient for now) and create an empty space.Create a new Content Type and add few fields to it.
  • js file and use axios to make a GET request to Contentful server.import axios from ‘axios’;export const FETCH_POSTS = ‘FETCH_POSTS’;const API_BASE_URL = API_SPACE_ID = ‘buyxxxxxxx’;const API_TOKEN = function fetchPosts() { const request = return { type: FETCH_POSTS, payload: request };}fetchPosts action creator will return an action , which is nothing but a plain JavaScript object with a type property.
  • /actions/index’;const INITIAL_STATE = { all: [] };export default function(state = INITIAL_STATE, action) { switch(action.type) { case FETCH_POSTS: return { …state, all: action.payload.data.items }; default: return state; }}Next we will update the application state in .
  • /posts_reducer’;const rootReducer = combineReducers({ posts: PostsReducer});export default rootReducer;Displaying postsTo get our app working, now we’ll promote the PostsIndex component to a Redux container in .
  • /actions/index’;class PostsIndex extends Component { componentWillMount() { this.props.fetchPosts(); } renderPosts() { return this.props.posts.map((post, index) = { return ( article key={post.sys.id} h3{post.fields.title}/h3 p{post.fields.description}/p /article ); }); } render() { return ( div h2Blog Posts/h2 {this.renderPosts()} /div ); }}function mapStateToProps(state) { return { posts: state.posts.all };}export default connect(mapStateToProps, { fetchPosts })(PostsIndex);Then go to the browser, refresh the page and check the results.Now the existing UI may look very dull, only few headlines followed by some paragraphs.

When I first started to re-design my company website I was very excited to use ReactJS to build the front-end application in the React way. But soon I realised, in the excitement of using the new JS…
Continue reading “How to build a React-Redux application with API-first CMS Contentful”

The Easiest Way to Learn React Native – Handlebar Labs – Medium

“The Easiest Way to Learn React Native” by @spencer_carli #javascript #react #reactnative

  • The Easiest Way to Learn React NativeI’ve spent a lot of time working with React Native.
  • I started using it very shortly after it was open sourced and have used it daily since that time — growing with the platform, experiencing different upgrading pains, transitioning between different navigators, and so on…I’ve also spent a lot of time putting together tutorials about React Native (40+ blog posts, 15+ videos) and talking to people getting started with it (hundreds of incredible emails).
  • There are a ton of great learning resources out there already but they can be scattered between dozens of blog posts, in a less than ideal format (some people like text, some like video, etc.), and some people just aren’t ready to invest hours upon hours researching yet.With all of this information I wanted to try my hand at putting together the easiest way to start learning React Native.
  • A time friendly, budget friendly, single source of information to get you that essential 20% of knowledge.That’s what Create Your First React Native App is.
  • Or think of it this way, if you value your time at $30 per hour and it saves you even an hour of your time, the course will have paid for itself.I’m excited to share this with you and I hope that it will make using React Native more accessible to more people!Sign Up for Create Your First React Native AppQuestions?

I’ve spent a lot of time working with React Native. I started using it very shortly after it was open sourced and have used it daily since that time — growing with the platform, experiencing…
Continue reading “The Easiest Way to Learn React Native – Handlebar Labs – Medium”

Best Web Development & Programming Blogs for 2017

  • The blogs are more light-hearted and deal with coding more generally.
  • Even though this is a list of web developer blogs, we wanted to include two of our all-time favorite blogs.
  • His blog posts are great for back-end developers who focus on JavaScript and Node.js.
  • The blog has been around since 2005 and still posts fairly frequently to this day.
  • The blogs below are listed in alphabetical order.

There are a ton of great developer blogs out there, so we’ve curated a list of our team’s favorites along with top choices from some members of our community of expert developers.
Continue reading “Best Web Development & Programming Blogs for 2017”

Takeaways from React Europe 2016

Takeaways from #ReactEurope 2016:  #ReactJS

  • Watch the talk, get exited and evaluate if it’s suitable for your case.
  • Implementing the library seems not to be the hardest part of the library life-cycle.
  • blogs create an illusion that the community is active
  • There’s so much post-implementation work to do to make the library successful.
  • Let me share the most interesting ideas from the conference.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Takeaways from #ReactEurope 2016: #ReactJS”


Vinted engineering blog


Takeaways from React Europe 2016