Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

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#reactjs

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React application: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • Once you’ve done that you can always import files relative to the directory:

    Whilst this does tie your application code to Webpack, I think it’s a worthwhile trade-off because it makes your code much easier to follow and imports much easier to add, so this is a step I’ll take with all new projects.

  • For example, we have a folder called that contains all components relating to the shopping cart view, and a folder called that contains code for listing things users can buy on a page.
  • Following on from the previous rule, we stick to a convention of one React component file, and the component should always be the default export.
  • Normally our React files look like so:

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications :picking tools, structuring files,and breaking components up into smaller pieces
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How to Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale — SitePoint

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • /lib/baz’

    When you’re building your app with Webpack you can tell Webpack to always look in a specific directory for a file if it can’t find it, which lets you define a base folder that all your imports can become relative to.

  • For example, my top level folder structure often contains:
    – src = app code here
    – webpack = webpack configs
    – scripts = any build scripts
    – tests = any test specific code (API mocks, etc)

    Typically the only files that will be at the top level are index.html, package.json, and any dotfiles, such as .

  • Normally our React files look like so:
    import React, { Component, PropTypes } from ‘react’

    export default class Total extends Component {

    }

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:
    import React, { Component, PropTypes } from ‘react’
    import { connect } from ‘react-redux’

    export class Total extends Component {

    }

    export default connect(() = {…})(Total)

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

  • Although we don’t recognize it by splitting them into folders, you can broadly split our app into two types of components:
    “smart” components that manipulate data, connect to Redux, and deal with user interaction
    “dumb” components that are given a set of props and render some data to the screen
    You can read more about how we aim for “dumb” components in my blog post on Functional Stateless Components in React.

Jack Franklin describes a set of tips and best practices for creating and organizing React applications in a scalable way.
Continue reading “How to Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale — SitePoint”

Context in ReactJS Applications

  • The short answer is that you should very rarely, if ever use context in your own React components.
  • Context acts like a portal in your application in which components can make data available to other components further down the tree without being passed through explictly as props.
  • If an interim component does this, a child component won’t update, even if a context value changes:

    In the above example, if changes, will not render, because its parent returned from .

  • Libraries like React Router use context to allow the components that they provide application developers to communicate.
  • It exposes the object on the context, and other than that it simply renders the children that it’s given:

    expects to find , and it registers itself when it’s rendered:

    Finally, we can use the and components in our own app:

    The beauty of context in this situation is that as library authors we can provide components that can work in any situation, regardless of where they are rendered.

There is a lot of confusion amongst React developers on what context is, and why it exists. It’s also a feature that’s been hidden in the React documentation in the past and, although it is now documented on the React site I thought a post on its usage and when to use it would be of use.
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Useful Features of React.js

RT DBaker007: Useful Features of #ReactJS codecondoltd  #coding #programmers #JavaScript #…

  • The virtual DOM in this case is the data and not the rendered content React.js is able to determine the pieces of data that have actually changed in great detail.
  • It has a data binding and state management feature that makes it an ideal platform for creating dynamic applications.
  • Many web developers will not have this, as speed is key whenever you are creating applications.
  • React.js is currently amongst the best JavaScript UI framework that a lot of web developers are finding useful in many ways.
  • If a certain change is made on the data upstream, the components using that particular data will automatically re-render in order to reflect the changes.

Read the full article, click here.


@lockpaddy: “RT DBaker007: Useful Features of #ReactJS codecondoltd #coding #programmers #JavaScript #…”


by
Jake Lawrence
on
December 27, 2015


Useful Features of React.js