“ReactJS Transitions” byKelly Harrop

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Create fluid transitions using ReactJS….
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Ext JS to React: Class Instantiation and Code Style

  • Ext JS components are really just JavaScript functions which allow you to use the keyword: – – This means each class is native JavaScript.
  • Meaning, JSX enables you to outline not only the HTML and React component structure, but also call other JavaScript functions or even execute code statements right from within the JSX body.
  • Here is an example functional React component: – – This code sample highlights one of the major differences between Ext JS and React.
  • JSX is a very common strategy when creating React components.
  • Instead, each component is instantiated by React itself when you include the component class in returned JSX (i.e. in the example above).

React enjoys the benefits of the latest ECMAScript conventions (with some transpiling magic from Babel) along with JSX syntax. In the following sections, we will look at how Ext JS components are instantiated along with how a functional component is used in a React app. We’ll also review common coding styles that differ between the two ecosystems. Just a note before we proceed, this blog post aims to discuss how React components are created and used, but doesn’t wade into the various ways components may be defined initially. We’ll dedicate our next blog post in the series to the topic of defining React components.
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Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs

  • If you’re using Create React App, Next.js, Gatsby, or a similar tool, you will have a Webpack setup out of the box to bundle your app.
  • You need to keep an eye on the code you are including in your bundle so that you don’t accidentally make it so large that your app takes a long time to load.
  • While you haven’t reduced the overall amount of code in your app, you’ve avoided loading code that the user may never need, and reduced the amount of code needed during the initial load.
  • For that you will need Loadable wraps dynamic imports in a nice, React-friendly API for introducing code splitting into your app at a given component.
  • Here’s an example of how to setup route-based code splitting into your app using libraries like React Router and React Loadable.

Most React apps will have their files “bundled” using tools like
Webpack or Browserify.
Bundling is the process of following imported files and merging them into a
single file: a “bundle”. This bundle can then be included on a webpage to load
an entire app at once.
Continue reading “Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs”

Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs

  • If you’re using Create React App, Next.js, Gatsby, or a similar tool you will have a Webpack setup out of the box to bundle your app.
  • You need to keep an eye on the code you are including in your bundle so that you don’t accidentally make it so large that your app takes a long time to load.
  • When Webpack comes across this syntax, it automatically start code-splitting your app.
  • You want to make sure you choose places that will split bundles evenly, but not be terribly interuptive to the users of your app.
  • Here’s an example of how to setup route-based code splitting into your app using libraries like React Router and React Loadable.

Most React apps will have their files “bundled” using tools like
Webpack or Browserify.
Bundling is the process of following imported files and merging them into a
single file: a “bundle”. This bundle can then be included on a webpage to load
an entire app at once.
Continue reading “Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs”

Create a React app with zero configuration using Parcel

Create a React app with zero configuration using Parcel  #ReactJS

  • Create React App was created to make it easier and quicker to get started.
  • The problem with creat react app is that it hides the webpack config.
  • When your app grows and you need something a bit more advanced, you have to eject and then you get a huge webpack config.
  • I tried it on a large code base, and it worked out-of-the-box!
  • Parcel looks like a decent alternative to Create React App.

We have all experienced the pain of getting started with React. You spend hours to configure webpack before you can start actual coding.
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React v16.2.0: Improved Support for Fragments

React 16.2 is here:  - the biggest addition is support for

  • To make the authoring experience as convenient as possible, we’re adding syntactical support for fragments to JSX: – – In React, this desugars to a element, as in the example from the previous section.
  • Support for fragment syntax in JSX will vary depending on the tools you use to build your app.
  • Support for JSX fragments is available in Babel v7.0.0-beta.31 and above!
  • Upgrade to the latest TypeScript with the command: – – Flow support for JSX fragments is available starting in version 0.59!
  • A big thanks to everyone who filed issues, contributed to syntax discussions, reviewed pull requests, added support for JSX fragments in third party libraries, and more!

React 16.2 is now available! The biggest addition is improved support for returning multiple children from a component’s render method. We call this feature fragments:
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Preact.js : Shopping Cart

@preactjs shopping cart with stock status. Link:  #preactjs #reactjs

  • You can apply CSS to your Pen from any stylesheet on the web.
  • Just put a URL to it here and we’ll apply it, in the order you have them, before the CSS in the Pen itself.
  • If the stylesheet you link to has the file extension of a preprocessor, we’ll attempt to process it before applying.
  • You can also link to another Pen here, and we’ll pull the CSS from that Pen and include it.
  • If it’s using a matching preprocessor, we’ll combine the code before preprocessing, so you can use the linked Pen as a true dependency.


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