Top React and Redux Packages for Faster Development

Top React and Redux Packages for Faster Development

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#Reactjs #Redux

  • After all, we always want our development tools to – Via GiphyIf you are a beginner in React, you may find some of the packages helpful in debugging or visualising various abstract parts of your app.
  • React StorybookWhile creating applications in React, you must have had this thought at least once: What if I could see a rendition of the component that I am using(or making) and see how it behaves under different combinations of props, states, and actions.
  • Demo from storybook’s repoSome highlights are — – Storybook runs outside of your app.This allows the components to be developed in isolation from the app development.It also means that you do not have to worry about various dependencies while creating the components.Other similar packages are: React Cosmos, React Styleguidist -…
  • It keeps track of the props and states, and when a component is re-rendered without any change in the props or the state, the package logs the details in the console.
  • Image from Why did you update’s repoCreate React App(CRA)Not exactly a development tool, but over the years I have found that this package is really helpful in creating rapid prototypes.

React has grown in popularity over the last few years. With that, a lot of tools have emerged that make developer’s life easy and development fun. They are going to help us in achieving the extra…
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Destructuring and Function Arguments

  • The JavaScript language has benefitted from some really awesome new features over the past few years, including arrow functions, the spread operator, and default function argument values.
  • One of my favorite new(ish) JavaScript features is object destructuring.
  • If you aren’t familiar with JavaScript destructuring, it basically provides a shorter syntax for extracting an object key’s value without the dot notation mess: – – The basic syntax for destructuring is fairly simple but using destructuring with function arguments can be a bit more difficult when those argument values…
  • The following is a function with arguments having default values: – – Regardless of language, if a function takes more than ~3 parameters, it’s probably best to pass in an object name  or  that contains possible key/values; the equivalent would look like: – – What if you want to use…
  • The following function signature would become: – – If you want to define defaults in the function configuration, you’d use the following: – – Setting a default with is important; with no default the following example would error: – – Destructuring is an awesome language feature but can lead to…

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Making of a component library for React – Hacker Noon

Making of a component library for React  #reactjs

  • For this library, this is what I had at the end: – assets/ — Skip this folder, this is just for images I had in API docsbuild/ — UMD and ES module build files + sourcemaps.examples/ — This folder contains test .
  • PopupMenu header partAs we build components for UI we include style files, rollup allows us to make bundles with styles and images the same way as webpack does.
  • import React, {Component} from ‘react’;In my case I even need to use React to provide context to child components this old way: (old because recently React introduced new Context API).
  • I have PopupTable that takes popupWidth of the parent PopupMenu – React context in PopupMenu classI would like to also highlight classnames npm module that does pretty good job in combining multiple classes from CSS modules: – classnames module exampleUsage: – Unit testingFirst you need to decide which unit-testing framework you…
  • Example: – // Jest Snapshot v1, should render correctly 1`] = ` – div – div – onMouseOut={[Function]} – onMouseOver={[Function]} – / – div – onMouseOut={[Function]} – onMouseOver={[Function]} – style={ – Object { – “height”: “auto”, – “left”: “calc(-100px + 50%)”, – “visibility”: “hidden”, – “width”: “calc(200px – 10px)”, -…

Some time ago I decided to make an article that covers topics like publishing to NPM, API architecture. Best tutorial for this would be a react component library development. A good example of React…
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“ReactJS Transitions” byKelly Harrop

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Create fluid transitions using ReactJS….
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Ext JS to React: Class Instantiation and Code Style

  • Ext JS components are really just JavaScript functions which allow you to use the keyword: – – This means each class is native JavaScript.
  • Meaning, JSX enables you to outline not only the HTML and React component structure, but also call other JavaScript functions or even execute code statements right from within the JSX body.
  • Here is an example functional React component: – – This code sample highlights one of the major differences between Ext JS and React.
  • JSX is a very common strategy when creating React components.
  • Instead, each component is instantiated by React itself when you include the component class in returned JSX (i.e. in the example above).

React enjoys the benefits of the latest ECMAScript conventions (with some transpiling magic from Babel) along with JSX syntax. In the following sections, we will look at how Ext JS components are instantiated along with how a functional component is used in a React app. We’ll also review common coding styles that differ between the two ecosystems. Just a note before we proceed, this blog post aims to discuss how React components are created and used, but doesn’t wade into the various ways components may be defined initially. We’ll dedicate our next blog post in the series to the topic of defining React components.
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Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs

  • If you’re using Create React App, Next.js, Gatsby, or a similar tool, you will have a Webpack setup out of the box to bundle your app.
  • You need to keep an eye on the code you are including in your bundle so that you don’t accidentally make it so large that your app takes a long time to load.
  • While you haven’t reduced the overall amount of code in your app, you’ve avoided loading code that the user may never need, and reduced the amount of code needed during the initial load.
  • For that you will need Loadable wraps dynamic imports in a nice, React-friendly API for introducing code splitting into your app at a given component.
  • Here’s an example of how to setup route-based code splitting into your app using libraries like React Router and React Loadable.

Most React apps will have their files “bundled” using tools like
Webpack or Browserify.
Bundling is the process of following imported files and merging them into a
single file: a “bundle”. This bundle can then be included on a webpage to load
an entire app at once.
Continue reading “Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs”

Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs

  • If you’re using Create React App, Next.js, Gatsby, or a similar tool you will have a Webpack setup out of the box to bundle your app.
  • You need to keep an eye on the code you are including in your bundle so that you don’t accidentally make it so large that your app takes a long time to load.
  • When Webpack comes across this syntax, it automatically start code-splitting your app.
  • You want to make sure you choose places that will split bundles evenly, but not be terribly interuptive to the users of your app.
  • Here’s an example of how to setup route-based code splitting into your app using libraries like React Router and React Loadable.

Most React apps will have their files “bundled” using tools like
Webpack or Browserify.
Bundling is the process of following imported files and merging them into a
single file: a “bundle”. This bundle can then be included on a webpage to load
an entire app at once.
Continue reading “Just landed my PR addings docs about code splitting to the @reactjs docs”

Create a React app with zero configuration using Parcel

Create a React app with zero configuration using Parcel  #ReactJS

  • Create React App was created to make it easier and quicker to get started.
  • The problem with creat react app is that it hides the webpack config.
  • When your app grows and you need something a bit more advanced, you have to eject and then you get a huge webpack config.
  • I tried it on a large code base, and it worked out-of-the-box!
  • Parcel looks like a decent alternative to Create React App.

We have all experienced the pain of getting started with React. You spend hours to configure webpack before you can start actual coding.
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React v16.2.0: Improved Support for Fragments

React 16.2 is here:  - the biggest addition is support for

  • To make the authoring experience as convenient as possible, we’re adding syntactical support for fragments to JSX: – – In React, this desugars to a element, as in the example from the previous section.
  • Support for fragment syntax in JSX will vary depending on the tools you use to build your app.
  • Support for JSX fragments is available in Babel v7.0.0-beta.31 and above!
  • Upgrade to the latest TypeScript with the command: – – Flow support for JSX fragments is available starting in version 0.59!
  • A big thanks to everyone who filed issues, contributed to syntax discussions, reviewed pull requests, added support for JSX fragments in third party libraries, and more!

React 16.2 is now available! The biggest addition is improved support for returning multiple children from a component’s render method. We call this feature fragments:
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Preact.js : Shopping Cart

@preactjs shopping cart with stock status. Link:  #preactjs #reactjs

  • You can apply CSS to your Pen from any stylesheet on the web.
  • Just put a URL to it here and we’ll apply it, in the order you have them, before the CSS in the Pen itself.
  • If the stylesheet you link to has the file extension of a preprocessor, we’ll attempt to process it before applying.
  • You can also link to another Pen here, and we’ll pull the CSS from that Pen and include it.
  • If it’s using a matching preprocessor, we’ll combine the code before preprocessing, so you can use the linked Pen as a true dependency.


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