@acemarke/redux-starter-kit

  • A simple set of tools to make using Redux easier – – The package is intended to help address three common complaints about Redux: – – We can’t solve every use case, but in the spirit of and , we can try to provide some tools that abstract over the…
  • Takes a single configuration object parameter, with the following options: – – A utility function to create reducers that handle specific action types, similar to the example function in the “Reducing Boilerplate” Redux docs page.
  • Takes an initial state value and an object that maps action types to case reducer functions.
  • Internally, it uses the library, so you can write code in your case reducers that mutates the existing value, and it will correctly generate immutably-updated state values instead.
  • It also accepts an object of customization options for more specific use cases.

A simple set of tools to make using Redux easier
Continue reading “@acemarke/redux-starter-kit”

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

☞ 

#reactjs

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React application: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • Once you’ve done that you can always import files relative to the directory:

    Whilst this does tie your application code to Webpack, I think it’s a worthwhile trade-off because it makes your code much easier to follow and imports much easier to add, so this is a step I’ll take with all new projects.

  • For example, we have a folder called that contains all components relating to the shopping cart view, and a folder called that contains code for listing things users can buy on a page.
  • Following on from the previous rule, we stick to a convention of one React component file, and the component should always be the default export.
  • Normally our React files look like so:

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications :picking tools, structuring files,and breaking components up into smaller pieces
Continue reading “Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale”

ReactJS Stockholm Meetup #3

May 18 I will speak about @Logux_io in Stockholm

  • This is only to pre-RSVP the event and you will still need to attend on meetup in order to get a place at the event.
  • in order to get an update when the RSVP opens.

The first ReactJS Meetup of 2017 is here!
With the author of PostCSS (Andrey) and the author of SVGO (Kir), we present an exciting line-up at this ReactJS Meetup for all Javascripters out there.
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10 Famous Apps Using ReactJS Nowadays

10 Famous Apps Using ReactJS Nowadays #reactjs #react #js #javascript #development #apps

  • Interestingly, Facebook was the place where the ReactJS library was initially created, which is why it is obvious for the app to use it.
  • Facebook currently opened a beta of its completely rewritten ReactJS, called React Fiber.
  • Netflix has even published an official blog post explaining how the ReactJS library helps their startup speed, runtime performance, modularity and various other advantages.
  • As of recently, the all-new WhatsApp Web app has also been using React, just like the Facebook web experience mentioned above.
  • In the end, the reduced risk, ReactJS development efficiencies, improved effectiveness and numerous organizational benefits have all been reasons for the big names in apps to upgrade to ReactJS and exploit the amazing benefits offered by this script.

Major apps like Facebook, Instagram, Netflix are using ReactJS. Read more about great companies constantly improving their experience and adapting to ReactJS
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How to Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale — SitePoint

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • /lib/baz’

    When you’re building your app with Webpack you can tell Webpack to always look in a specific directory for a file if it can’t find it, which lets you define a base folder that all your imports can become relative to.

  • For example, my top level folder structure often contains:
    – src = app code here
    – webpack = webpack configs
    – scripts = any build scripts
    – tests = any test specific code (API mocks, etc)

    Typically the only files that will be at the top level are index.html, package.json, and any dotfiles, such as .

  • Normally our React files look like so:
    import React, { Component, PropTypes } from ‘react’

    export default class Total extends Component {

    }

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:
    import React, { Component, PropTypes } from ‘react’
    import { connect } from ‘react-redux’

    export class Total extends Component {

    }

    export default connect(() = {…})(Total)

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

  • Although we don’t recognize it by splitting them into folders, you can broadly split our app into two types of components:
    “smart” components that manipulate data, connect to Redux, and deal with user interaction
    “dumb” components that are given a set of props and render some data to the screen
    You can read more about how we aim for “dumb” components in my blog post on Functional Stateless Components in React.

Jack Franklin describes a set of tips and best practices for creating and organizing React applications in a scalable way.
Continue reading “How to Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale — SitePoint”

Building a React & MobX application with MVVM – Medium

Building a #ReactJS & #MobX app with MVVM:

  • Finally the last step is to wire up ViewModel and View, and proceed to render them.
  • Creating the domain models with MobX
  • Let’s now start by writing first our domain models, which in this example the only domain model is the “Todo” entity.
  • You simply need to update your view to use the MaterialUI components package!
  • As occurs in other languages, you can use multiple ways to wire up the View and the View Model.

Read the full article, click here.


@ReactiveConf: “Building a #ReactJS & #MobX app with MVVM:”


Today, we’ll deep dive into building a full TodoEditor with MobX and React, starting from the basics and ending with some considerations.


Building a React & MobX application with MVVM – Medium