Advanced React and Redux

  • This is the tutorial you’ve been looking for to take your React and Redux skills to the next level.
  • This course wastes no time diving right into interesting topics, and teaches you the core knowledge you need to deeply understand and build React components and structure applications with Redux.
  • Mastering React and Redux can get you a position in web development or help you build that personal project you’ve been dreaming of.
  • There are dozens of great tutorials online for React and Redux, but none of them teach the challenging, core features of these two fantastic libraries.
  • I have built the course that I would have wanted to take when I was learning React and Redux.

Detailed walkthroughs on advanced React and Redux concepts – Authentication, Testing, Middlewares, HOC’s, and Deployment
Continue reading “Advanced React and Redux”

React and Redux with TypeScript – gitconnected – Medium

React and Redux with TypeScript  #reactjs #typescript

  • This week I finally finished a side project I have been working on over the past few months to learn React and Redux in TypeScript; it is a Password Manager type app which if you want to check out you can find over on GitHub.Whilst building the app I did…
  • Sometimes I did find the rare example on StackOverflow or blog posts to help, but the majority of times I was on my own.Given my experience in working with React/Redux in TypeScript, I thought I would share examples of the major parts of these libraries all in one place to…
  • I use them to create presentational components i.e. those that define a UI element such as a navigation bar.For more information about Functional components in React, see the componentReduxActionsActions are the messages that are sent around an application to change state.For more information about the Actions, see this section of…
  • These Interfaces can be combined with others defined in different modules to define an ActionTypes type which describes all possible Actions in the application.Redux — Action typesAction CreatorsAction Creators are functions that return an Action, but they can also dispatch other Actions.
  • In the example below, the other Actions dispatched signal the state of the invocation i.e whether something is in progress, succeeded or failed.Redux — Action creatorsReducersReducers process Actions created in an application and in turn change the state in the Store, according to the type and payload.For more information about the Reducers,…

This week I finally finished a side project I have been working on over the past few months to learn React and Redux in TypeScript; it is a Password Manager type app which if you want to check out…
Continue reading “React and Redux with TypeScript – gitconnected – Medium”

Advanced React and Redux

  • This is the tutorial you’ve been looking for to take your React and Redux skills to the next level.
  • This course wastes no time diving right into interesting topics, and teaches you the core knowledge you need to deeply understand and build React components and structure applications with Redux.
  • Mastering React and Redux can get you a position in web development or help you build that personal project you’ve been dreaming of.
  • There are dozens of great tutorials online for React and Redux, but none of them teach the challenging, core features of these two fantastic libraries.
  • I have built the course that I would have wanted to take when I was learning React and Redux.

Detailed walkthroughs on advanced React and Redux concepts – Authentication, Testing, Middlewares, HOC’s, and Deployment
Continue reading “Advanced React and Redux”

Advanced React and Redux

  • This is the tutorial you’ve been looking for to take your React and Redux skills to the next level.
  • This course wastes no time diving right into interesting topics, and teaches you the core knowledge you need to deeply understand and build React components and structure applications with Redux.
  • Mastering React and Redux can get you a position in web development or help you build that personal project you’ve been dreaming of.
  • There are dozens of great tutorials online for React and Redux, but none of them teach the challenging, core features of these two fantastic libraries.
  • I have built the course that I would have wanted to take when I was learning React and Redux.

Detailed walkthroughs on advanced React and Redux concepts – Authentication, Testing, Middlewares, HOC’s, and Deployment
Continue reading “Advanced React and Redux”

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale

☞ 

#reactjs

  • In this article, I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React application: picking tools, structuring files, and breaking components up into smaller pieces.
  • Once you’ve done that you can always import files relative to the directory:

    Whilst this does tie your application code to Webpack, I think it’s a worthwhile trade-off because it makes your code much easier to follow and imports much easier to add, so this is a step I’ll take with all new projects.

  • For example, we have a folder called that contains all components relating to the shopping cart view, and a folder called that contains code for listing things users can buy on a page.
  • Following on from the previous rule, we stick to a convention of one React component file, and the component should always be the default export.
  • Normally our React files look like so:

    In the case that we have to wrap the component in order to connect it to a Redux data store, for example, the fully wrapped component becomes the default export:

    You’ll notice that we still export the original component; this is really useful for testing where you can work with the “plain” component and not have to set up Redux in your unit tests.

I’ll talk you through the decisions I make when building React applications :picking tools, structuring files,and breaking components up into smaller pieces
Continue reading “Organize a Large React Application and Make It Scale”

How to Build a Todo App Using React, Redux, and Immutable.js — SitePoint

  • This helps us get a feel for what we’re going to need our components to render:
    const dummyTodos = [
    { id: 0, isDone: true, text: ‘make components’ },
    { id: 1, isDone: false, text: ‘design actions’ },
    { id: 2, isDone: false, text: ‘implement reducer’ },
    { id: 3, isDone: false, text: ‘connect components’ }
    ];

    For this application, we’re only going to need two React components, Todo / and TodoList /.

  • js

    import React from ‘react’;

    export function Todo(props) {
    const { todo } = props;
    if(todo.isDone) {
    return strike{todo.text}/strike;
    } else {
    return span{todo.text}/span;
    }
    }

    export function TodoList(props) {
    const { todos } = props;
    return (
    div className=’todo’
    input type=’text’ placeholder=’Add todo’ /
    ul className=’todo__list’
    {todos.map(t = (
    li key={t.id} className=’todo__item’
    Todo todo={t} /
    /li
    ))}
    /ul
    /div
    );
    }

    At this point, we can test these components by creating an index.html file in the project folder and populating it with the following markup.

  • /components’;

    const dummyTodos = [
    { id: 0, isDone: true, text: ‘make components’ },
    { id: 1, isDone: false, text: ‘design actions’ },
    { id: 2, isDone: false, text: ‘implement reducer’ },
    { id: 3, isDone: false, text: ‘connect components’ }
    ];

    render(
    TodoList todos={dummyTodos} /,
    the code with npm run build, then navigate your browser to the index.html file and make sure that it’s working.

  • Our dummy data is a great place to start from, and we can easily translate it into ImmutableJS collections:
    import { List, Map } from ‘immutable’;

    const dummyTodos = List([
    Map({ id: 0, isDone: true, text: ‘make components’ }),
    Map({ id: 1, isDone: false, text: ‘design actions’ }),
    Map({ id: 2, isDone: false, text: ‘implement reducer’ }),
    Map({ id: 3, isDone: false, text: ‘connect components’ })
    ]);

    ImmutableJS maps don’t work in the same way as JavaScript’s objects, so we’ll need to make some slight tweaks to our components.

  • The mapStateToProps function takes the store’s current state as an argument (in our case, a list of todos), then it expects the return value to be an object that describes a mapping from that state to props for our wrapped component:
    function mapStateToProps(state) {
    return { todos: state };
    }

    It might help to visualize this on an instance of the wrapped React component:
    TodoList todos={state} /

    We’ll also need to supply a mapDispatchToProps function, which is passed the store’s dispatch method, so that we can use it to dispatch the actions from our action creators:
    function mapDispatchToProps(dispatch) {
    return {
    addTodo: text = dispatch(addTodo(text)),
    toggleTodo: id

Dan Prince shows how to build a Todo app using React, Redux, and Immutable.js.
Continue reading “How to Build a Todo App Using React, Redux, and Immutable.js — SitePoint”

Why build your forms with Redux Form – DailyJS – Medium

Why build your forms with #Redux Form:  #ReactJS

  • Why build your forms with Redux FormWhen I usually create forms for my React/Redux applications I tend to keep the value of the inputs on the application state, with little to no editing, (because my forms are usually simple), I never stopped to realize what that means.
  • It also receives an event handler that will update the state when the user interacts with it.It means that when the user types the letter “J” on the input, what is visible is not the same “J”, it may be an identical “J” that comes from the state, or whatever the event handler has put in there.Ok but, that doesn’t answer the first questionBy having all the application state in the JavaScript app and using controlled components we get a single source of truth and take full control over the application behavior.In the context of a form, our React component is able to:do instant validation;control the input value format;enable, disable, show or hide components given the state;handle dynamic inputs.Although it is highly recommended to use controlled components, it is also good to point the drawback that you will have to create event handlers for all your inputs and that may be a bunch of code that doesn’t make sense to the application.What about Redux Form?Now that is known why to keep the form data in the state and you reason if that makes sense for your application we can come back to our main subject.
  • It keeps track of all common application form state such as:The fields that are in the form;The values of each field;The focused field;If the field values are valid;The fields that the user have interacted with;If the form is being submitted;If is happening any asynchronous validation.Let’s take a look at a bit of code and see how to do a setup.Here we connect the form component to Redux by decorating it with the high-order component reduxForm.
  • It will also hand us the handleSubmit function, which will take care of the submission behavior.The Field component takes our input component as its props and acts as a container, bringing the application state to the input component and binding the event handlers to update the state in store.Look at the InputText component to see the props we receive from the Field.One important point is that it’s still a developer’s responsibility to write the form and inputs components, this way the library does not take the flexibility from you to manage the behaviors of your form the way you want, or even add custom ones.And to finish our integration we add a reducer that will handle the state changes of your form.Simple isn’t it.Just one more point.
  • Look that the default value of the input is defined when the high-order component reduxForm is called and comes to the input within the prop input and not from the react’s prop defaultValue, this way we guarantee that our form values are all represented in the application state.In summary, having all your form data in application state gives you control over its behavior and you can easily implement that on a React/Redux application with Redux Form.I have created a repository on GitHub with the implementation above.

When I usually create forms for my React/Redux applications I tend to keep the value of the inputs on the application state, with little to no editing, (because my forms are usually simple), I never…
Continue reading “Why build your forms with Redux Form – DailyJS – Medium”