Ruby on Rails Is Dead — 2018 Edition – JetRuby

  • The rumors of Ruby’s nascent (inevitable, immutable, irreversible) demise have been whispered about for years inside developer locker rooms, and yet the language and Rails, the framework, are still around, powering hundreds of thousands of websites.
  • The TIOBE index (the index that uses search engine results) places Ruby in the top 20 technologies.
  • It just so happens that due to the unique nature of Ruby, we’re able to write clean code — faster, which is a great thing for startups and businesses that run on lean innovation.
  • Let’s not forget what makes Ruby greatRuby teaches you some great coding habits: such as TDD approach, MVC pattern, separate databases, DRY code, and restful routes, which in the end translates to clean code that needs less testing.
  • It’s up to you, but the truth is: if you’re making a web or enterprise app, with Ruby you’ll write better quality code, spend less time testing and launch your product before your competitors do, so you can start getting revenue and think about where to take your product next….

It’s 2018, and it’s high time for us at JetRuby to once again scrutinise everything we believe in, and answer the million (ish)-dollar question: The rumors of Ruby’s nascent (inevitable, immutable…

It’s 2018, and it’s high time for us at JetRuby to once again scrutinise everything we believe in, and answer the million (ish)-dollar question:

“Is Ruby/Rails finally deader than a coffin nail in 2018?”

The rumors of Ruby’s nascent (inevitable, immutable, irreversible) demise have been whispered about for years inside developer locker rooms, and yet the language and Rails, the framework, are still around, powering hundreds of thousands of websites. (Sigh)Do I even need to mention yet again that Github, AirBnB, Hulu at al continue using RoR? To me, that’s a sign of doing pretty darn good, arguably, better than most programming languages, since not all languages/tools are lucky enough to reach these peaks of prominence/awesomeness and credibility.

So perhaps it’s time to move away from the morbid, sensationalist language of technological death and discuss Ruby on Rails in more reasonable and meaningful terms.

So sit back. Pour yourself a mason jar of peppermint tea and Let’s just sensibly talk about what we really mean:

What is the state of Ruby on Rails at the dawn of 2018?

The TIOBE index (the index that uses search engine results) places Ruby in the top 20 technologies. In a Stack overflow 2017 survey, Ruby is in the top 10 most popular languages. And yes, none of these rankings hysterically scream “popularity” like a 6th grade girl at a Jonas Brothers concern, but I would argue, that’s a good thing.

Ruby on Rails Is Dead — 2018 Edition – JetRuby