Haxe Summit 2017 in Amsterdam

It's Friday! #haxesummit #reactjs #javascript

  • The Haxe Summit 2017 is a four day conference for Haxe professionals to connect with one another as well as the authors of the tools they are actively using or considering to add to their toolchain.
  • It will be packed with hands on tutorials and workshop, panel discussions covering various aspects of Haxe and of course a wide selection of talks to improve visibility of all the things going on within Haxe’s busy ecosystem.

The Haxe Summit 2017 is a four day conference for Haxe professionals to connect with one another as well as the authors of the tools they are actively using or considering to add to their toolchain.

@ali_o_kan: It’s Friday! #haxesummit #reactjs #javascript

We are putting together a schedule with two separate tracks for game and web development. It will be packed with hands on tutorials and workshop, panel discussions covering various aspects of Haxe and of course a wide selection of talks to improve visibility of all the things going on within Haxe’s busy ecosystem.

By day, Hugh works on machine vision, and by night he works his vision on a machine, writing the hxcpp haxe target. Find him on twitter @GameHaxe, where he ponders the mysteries of this universe as he tries to work out how to use git. Hugh has been programming with Haxe for over 7 years and is the primary contributor to the c++ back-end. He has also made significant contributions to the Nme, Waxe and Gm2d libraries.

Originally design director and professor, David gradually switched into software engineering and became Happy Technologies CTO. Thanks to a 15 years experience in web app conception, he gives his support to application architecture problems and development choices. He also manages the development team, promoting agile practices, industrialization and continuous improvement. Convinced by knowledge sharing and open source development, he commits himself with various community activities. He is co-founder of the TTFX digital community and “Code of War” creator.

Francis Bourre is a software architect at Docler Holding. He was CTO at periscope-creations.com whose clients include Ubisoft, EA Games, Michelin, Sony, Nintendo, Apple… He worked as a game developer for Candy Crush licence at king.com, made research and development for building persistent world platform at prizee.com, and contributed to many projects as a freelancer for big names industry.

In parallel, he spoke at many conferences, worked on various projects such as game engines and open-source frameworks for application development. Bourre is known for his eclectism (he is also an electro-jazz musician and novelist) and his esthetic code approach. He has written many articles and tutorials about OOP and design patterns.

DSLs are small languages, focused on a particular aspect of your software system. You can’t build a whole program with a DSL, but you often use multiple DSLs in a system mainly written in a general purpose language.

Ronan has been developing games professionally for more than 7 years, but he has always played with many parts of the dev stack (server, client and now blockchain, smart contract). Haxe has been with him since that time too, however it is only last year when Ronan co-founded Etherplay that he could start using it full time. He uses it for games, backend and now communicating with Ethereum.

Etherplay is a skill game platform that use Ethereum to provide transparency and other benefit to our players.

Haxe had a very important place in building the platform. Its type safety and macro helped us in many ways and we would like to share how it helped us and what we build with it. We use Haxe both for our backend where it interact with Ethereum and for our games running on the web. In both case, Haxe was our friend and we have few tools/lib that might interest the audience.

Dan has been having fun with programming since he was seven, and is still enjoying it. He’s gone from web development in Python, through Flash/AS3 to game development using C# and Haxe. He seriously fell in love with Haxe and uses it to the max for his everyday work. He actively contributes to open-source tools he’s using, so Haxe became the main target of his open-source work.

Doug has more than 20 years experience as a professional software developer leading dozens of projects for organizations like GameHouse, RealNetworks and the Department of Defense. He was nominated for a distinguished dissertation award for his Ph.D. thesis work in the field of Artificial Intelligence. He has published over 15 academic research papers and contributed to 2 patents.

Today he is responsible for all technical aspects of FlowPlay’s virtual game worlds with a particular focus on the challenges of delivering high performance, massively multi-threaded software targeting a wide range of platforms.

DSLs are small languages, focused on a particular aspect of your software system. You can’t build a whole program with a DSL, but you often use multiple DSLs in a system mainly written in a general purpose language.

It’s targeted to every developer who wants to have a nice introduction about DSL power in the application world, and have a first taste of Haxe macros black magic.

Haxe had a very important place in building the platform. Its type safety and macro helped us in many ways and we would like to share how it helped us and what we build with it. We use Haxe both for our backend where it interact with Ethereum and for our games running on the web. In both case, Haxe was our friend and we have few tools/lib that might interest the audience.

Haxe Summit 2017 in Amsterdam