Build a React Image Gallery with Cloudinary

  • Cloudinary Just announced a React SDK that enables you to easily build a responsive image gallery.
  • Let’s build a simple React app in this file and test it:

    Before the app can be rendered, we need to create an entry where the React compiled app will be rendered:

    Let’s handle the styles now, instead of worrying about it later:

    Run in your terminal and in another terminal to test the app:

    The most significant content in the styles is where we are using media queries to make each image full width for small devices and x by x of the width for larger devices.

  • Moving forward, we need to configure the installed Cloudinary SDK with the :

    The component is used to create a config context that would wrap a group of images and image transformations.

  • The React Cloudinary SDK also provides a component that gives you the ability to apply transformation declaratively as :

    The , , and properties are provided by Cloudinary to help you adjust images to make them fit your responsive design while still retaining the image quality.

  • With few lines of codes, we were able to add a responsive image gallery to a React app.

In this article, we’ll show you how Cloudinary’s responsive transformation features enable you to quickly and easily create a responsive image gallery.

@CodementorIO: Build a #React #Image Gallery with #Cloudinary #reactjs #javascript

If you are displaying multiple images on your website, you probably use image galleries. Galleries are very useful, but can be challenging to integrate into a responsive design. In this article, we’ll show you how Cloudinary’s responsive transformation features enable you to quickly and easily create a responsive image gallery. The examples will be built with React.

Cloudinary Just announced a React SDK that enables you to easily build a responsive image gallery. You can simply drop an image from the cloud into your React app and apply transformations as config options.

There are minimal requirements to set up React. Webpack, the de facto module bundling tool, needs to configured and React-related loaders added:

The process is very simple and straight to the point. We specify both the entry and output points, then tell Webpack to pass our JSX files through the babel loader.

Next, React, Cloudinary’s React SDK, and other related dependencies, including Webpack and the respective loaders, must be installed:

above:

source code using Webpack and serving them to the browser.

file:

. Let’s build a simple React app in this file and test it:

where the React compiled app will be rendered:

Let’s handle the styles now, instead of worrying about it later:

in another terminal to test the app:

The most significant content in the styles is where we are using media queries to make each image full width for small devices and x by x of the width for larger devices. Simple stuff!

After setting up React and testing that everything works as expected, let’s see how we can employ Cloudinary, a cloud-based media management solution that provides storage, transformation, and delivery.

To get a private cloud, you need to sign up for free, and note your cloud name and credentials as seen on the dashboard.

You can use the available SDKs to upload images to your cloud or upload images manually via the dashboard:

As you can see, I have uploaded some Christmas images I got from Pexels.

component is used to create a config context that would wrap a group of images and image transformations. In that case, any image component or image transformation component added inside this context will inherit the configuration so there would be no need to explicitly specify another.

With a context created and configured, we need to start adding images:

must be valid and represent a given image in your cloud.

You can request multiple images and display them by iterating through the results:

tag and that is what we want.

properties are provided by Cloudinary to help you adjust images to make them fit your responsive design while still retaining the image quality.

With few lines of codes, we were able to add a responsive image gallery to a React app. Cloudinary saves you the stress of managing images especially when the image needs to be transformed as well as stored on a reliable server. The Cloudinary React SDK makes our work easier and code cleaner by abstracting the need to do a fetch directly to your Cloudinary server so as to retrieve images and transform them.

Build a React Image Gallery with Cloudinary